secus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from the Latin.

Adverb[edit]

secus ‎(not comparable)

  1. (law) otherwise, to the contrary.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the root of sequor. Properly, following, later in rank or order, i. e. less than something mentioned before.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

secus (not comparable)

  1. otherwise, to the contrary
  2. differently

Preposition[edit]

secus ‎(+ accusative)

  1. (= secundum) by, beside, along, on
  2. according to, in proportion to

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See sexus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

secus n ‎(no genitive); irregular declension

  1. sex
Declension[edit]

Not declined; used only in the nominative and accusative singular.

Case Singular
nominative secus
genitive
dative
accusative secus
ablative
vocative

References[edit]

  • secus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • secus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • SECUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • secus in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • this is quite another matter: hoc longe aliter, secus est
  • secus in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • secus (1) and secus (2) in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879