haver

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Scots haiver.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

haver ‎(third-person singular simple present havers, present participle havering, simple past and past participle havered)

  1. (Britain) To hem and haw
    • 1988, Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming Pool Library, Penguin Books, paperback edition, page 154
      This didn't seem at all unlikely, but when I none the less havered, he insisted that his 'Egyptian fortune-teller' had confirmed it.
  2. (Scotland), Usually haiver. To maunder; to talk foolishly; to chatter; talking nonsense; to babble
    • 1988, The Proclaimers, I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)
      And if I haver, yeah I know I’m gonna be / I’m gonna be the man who’s havering to you.
    • 2004 James Campbell, "Boswell and Mrs. Miller", in The Genius of Language (ed. Wendy Lesser), page 194
      She havers on about her "faither" and "mirra" and the "wee wean," her child, and "hoo i wiz glaiket but bonny forby."

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from Scots haver, from Middle English haver, from Old Norse hafri ‎(oat, oats), from Proto-Germanic *habrô ‎(oat, oats), from Proto-Indo-European *kapro- ‎(goat). Cognate with Dutch haver ‎(oats), cognate with German Hafer ‎(oat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

haver ‎(plural havers)

  1. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) The cereal oats.

Etymology 3[edit]

have +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

haver ‎(plural havers)

  1. One who has, possesses etc.
    • 1608, Shakespeare, Coriolanus (Act II, Scene 2)
      It is held / That valour is the chiefest virtue, and / Most dignifies the haver: if it be, / The man I speak of cannot in the world / Be singly counterpoised.
Synonyms[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō ‎(have, hold, possess).

Noun[edit]

haver m ‎(plural havers)

  1. A possession
  2. A credit

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

haver ‎(first-person singular present he, past participle hagut)

  1. to have, as an auxiliary verb for compound tenses
    • He fet.
      • I have done.

Conjugation[edit]

As heure, but with shortened present indicative, and with present subjunctive with -g- instead of -gu-. The 1st person form haig is only used in haver de.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

haver ‎(first-person singular present hec, past participle hagut)

  1. Alternative form of heure (Eastern) or haure (Western).

Conjugation[edit]

See heure or haure.

References[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

haver c

  1. plural indefinite of have

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch havere, from Old Dutch *havara, from Proto-Germanic *habrō. Cognate with Old Norse hafri, Old English haver, Old High German habaro.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

haver m ‎(uncountable, diminutive havertje n)

  1. any wild species or cultivar of the genus Avena
  2. in particular, Avena sativa, the cereal oats, notably fed to horses

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

haver

  1. imperative of haveren
  2. first-person singular present indicative of haveren

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Yiddish חבֿר ‎(khaver), from Hebrew חבר ‎(khaver, friend).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɒvɛr/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ver

Noun[edit]

haver ‎(plural haverok)

  1. (slang) pal, buddy

Declension[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hebrew חבר.

Noun[edit]

haver m ‎(Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling חאב׳יר)

  1. partner, comrade

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese aver, from Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō ‎(I have, I hold, I possess), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʰh₁bʰ- ‎(to grab, to take).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

haver ‎(first-person singular present indicative hei, past participle havido)

  1. (auxiliary with de and a verb in the infinitive) shall; ought to; should (forms the future tense, often with a prophetic or epic undertone)
    Amanhã, hei de ver o filme.
    Tomorrow, I ought to watch the movie.
  2. (auxiliary with a verb in the masculine singular past participle) have (forms the perfect aspect)
    1. (in the past tense) forms the past perfect
      Eu já havia entrado quando você chegou.
      I had already got in when you arrived.
    2. (in the present tense, archaic) forms the present perfect
      Eu hei estudado muito, nos últimos dias.
      I have been studying a lot, in these last days.
  3. (formal, impersonal, transitive) there be; exist
    um banco aqui perto.
    There is a bank nearby.
  4. (formal, impersonal, transitive) there be; to happen; to occur
    Houve um acidente na alameda.
    There was an accident in the avenue.
  5. (archaic, transitive) to have; to own; to possess
    Hei duas espadas.
    I have two swords.
  6. to recover; to regain (to obtain something that had been lost)
    Preciso haver meu dinheiro.
    I need to recover my money.
  7. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to behave (to conduct oneself well, on in a given manner)
  8. (impersonal, transitive) it has been ... since; ago (indicates the time since something occurred)
    Terminei a faculdade um mês.
    It has been one month since I’ve finished college.

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:haver.

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

haver m (plural haveres)

  1. outstanding debt

Synonyms[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English haver, from Old Norse hafri ‎(oat, oats), from Proto-Germanic *habrô ‎(oat, oats), from Proto-Indo-European *kapro- ‎(goat).

Noun[edit]

haver (uncountable)

  1. oats

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

haver

  1. has, have; present tense of hava., an older form of har