recover

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: re-cover

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English recoveren, rekeveren, from Anglo-Norman recoverer and Old French recovrer, from Latin recuperō, recuperāre, a late form of reciperō. Doublet of recuperate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

recover (third-person singular simple present recovers, present participle recovering, simple past and past participle recovered)

  1. (transitive) To get back, to regain (a physical thing; in astronomy and navigation, sight of a thing or a signal).
    After days of inquiries, he finally recovered his lost wallet.
    For days telescopes surveyed the skies to recover the small asteroid.
  2. (transitive) to salvage, to extricate, to rescue (a thing or person)
    They recovered three of the explorers very much alive, then another, wracked with severe hypothermia, who was taken to hospital.
    • 2020 August 26, “Network News: Mid-September before line reopens, says Network Rail”, in Rail, page 10:
      Network Rail doesn't expect the line through Carmont to open for around a month, as it faces the mammoth task of recovering the two power cars and four coaches from ScotRail's wrecked train, repairing bridge 325, stabilising earthworks around the landslip, and replacing the track.
  3. (transitive) To replenish to, resume (a good state of mind or body).
    At the top of the hill I asked to stop for a few minutes to recover my strength.
  4. (intransitive, law) To obtain a positive judgement; to win in a lawsuit.
    The plaintiff recovered in his suit, being awarded declaratory relief and a clearing of his name.
  5. (transitive, law) To gain as compensation or reparation, usually by formal legal process
    to recover damages in trespass; to recover debt and costs in a legal action or that is owing
    to recover land(s) in ejectment or common recovery
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To reach (a place), arrive at.
  7. (transitive, archaic) To restore to good health, consciousness, life etc.
  8. (transitive, archaic) To make good by reparation; to make up for; to retrieve; to repair the loss or injury of.
    to recover lost time
  9. (intransitive, followed by "from" to show what caused the bad feeling) To get better, to regain health or prosperity
    I was hurt, but I knew I'd recover, given time.
    Without calling in Business Recovery experts, the company saw trade and investor confidence recover sharply in the wake of the crisis.
    I lost out in the deal, but I quickly recovered financially
    It takes time and good health to recover from injury, surgery, a bereavement and emotional turmoil
    • 2020 December 2, Paul Bigland, “My weirdest and wackiest Rover yet”, in Rail, page 67:
      My trip along the rest of the line is delightful. It's yet another route that has recovered from previous rationalisation by having tracks and platforms reinstated in recent years.
  10. (transitive, archaic, without "from") to recover from
    To the end of his days, he never fully recovered his daughter's death.
  11. (intransitive) To regain one's composure, balance etc.
    Spinning round, he caught a stone with his ankle, but recovered quickly before turning to face me.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess:
      Meanwhile Nanny Broome was recovering from her initial panic and seemed anxious to make up for any kudos she might have lost, by exerting her personality to the utmost. She took the policeman's helmet and placed it on a chair, and unfolded his tunic to shake it and fold it up again for him.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

recover (plural recovers)

  1. (obsolete) Recovery. [14th-17thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xiiij, in Le Morte Darthur, book XX:
      It was neuer in my thoughte saide laūcelot to withholde the quene from my lord Arthur / but in soo moche she shold haue ben dede for my sake / me semeth it was my parte to saue her lyf and putte her from that daunger tyl better recouer myghte come / & now I thanke god sayd sir Launcelot that the pope hath made her pees
  2. (military) A position of holding a firearm during exercises, whereby the lock is at shoulder height and the sling facing out.
  3. (dated) The forward movement in rowing, after one stroke to take another (recovery)

Etymology 2[edit]

re- +‎ cover.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

recover (third-person singular simple present recovers, present participle recovering, simple past and past participle recovered)

  1. To cover again.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  2. (roofing) To add a new roof membrane or steep-slope covering over an existing one.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman recovre.

Noun[edit]

recover

  1. Alternative form of recovere

Etymology 2[edit]

From Anglo-Norman recoverer.

Verb[edit]

recover

  1. Alternative form of recoveren