Taipei

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See also: Taipéi

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
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Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
Colorful brush strokes behind the words “Taipei” and “臺北”
The Taipei city emblem

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Wade–Giles romanization of Mandarin 臺北台北 (Tʻai²-pei³, literally “Taiwan north”), composed of (tái) (short for Taiwan) and (běi, “north”).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /taɪˈpeɪ/, enPR: tīʹpāʹ
    • (file)
  • enPR: tīʹbāʹ[1]
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Proper noun[edit]

Taipei

  1. The capital city of and a special municipality of Taiwan, located in the northern part of the island of Taiwan. [from late 19th c.]
    • 1896, Clark, J. D., Formosa[3], Shanghai: Shanghai Mercury, OCLC 38700620, page 44:
      In 1885 Governor LIU determined to reconstruct Taipei and make it the temporary capital until, the railway having on its way to Taiwan reached the old town of Changhua, in about the middle of Formosa, he should build a city near that place and make it, under the name of Taiwan, the capital of the province of Taiwan.
    • 1947 February 1, “China”, in Foreign Commerce Weekly[4], volume XXVI, number 5, Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, ISSN 0097-3041, OCLC 1950822, page 14, column 2:
      Radiotelephonic communications were established in November 1946 between Taipei and Canton, thus augmenting the line already existing between Taipei and Shanghai.
      The Chinese National Aviation Corporation, which operated air service between Shanghai and Taipei three times a week, has added weekly air service between Foochow and Taipei. The Southwest Aviation Corp. is reportedly planning a Canton-Taipei air service, and damaged Japanese military transport aircraft have been under repair for use on this route.
    • 1964 November, “New Look at Changing China”, in National Geographic Magazine[5], volume 126, number 5, ISSN 0027-9358, OCLC 643483454, page 641, column 2:
      The “Beautiful Island” wears a necklace of rails and new roads dangling from Taipei, such as the 17-mile MacArthur Expressway linking the capital to the seaport of Chilung. Taiwan has two other international seaports —recently opened Hualien, on the east coast, and Kaohsiung, facing the mainland a scant 200 miles away.
    • 2000, Chen, Shui-Bian, “Learning and Transformation”, in David J. Toman, transl., The Son of Taiwan: The Life of Chen Shui-Bian and His Dreams for Taiwan[6], Taiwan Publishing Co., Ltd., →ISBN, OCLC 45640623, page 19:
      In my bid for re-election as mayor of Taipei, I lost to Ma Ying- jeou, representing the Kuomintang (KMT), Taiwan's ruling party. Analysis of the election results revealed that the overwhelming majority of "mainlanders"² in Taipei cast their votes for Mr. Ma.
    • 2005, Bill Clinton, My Life[7], volume I, New York: Vintage Books, →ISBN, OCLC 657070710, OL 8364561M, page 219:
      Years later, when I was governor, I found myself in the same hotel with Nureyev in Taipei, Taiwan.
    • 2014, Lu Hsiu-lien, Ashley Esarey, My Fight for a New Taiwan[8], University of Washington Press, →ISBN, LCCN 2013046731, OCLC 1039411006, OL 27156414M, pages 19-20:
      We lived in the county of Taoyuan, in northern Taiwan, around twenty-five miles south of the capital of Taipei.
    • 2022 April 14, Blanchard, Ben, “Six U.S. lawmakers arrive in Taiwan on unannounced trip”, in Raissa Kasolowsky, editor, Reuters[9], archived from the original on 14 April 2022, Asia Pacific:
      The bipartisan group, which will meet with Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen on Friday morning on their two-day visit, arrived at Taipei's downtown Songshan airport on a U.S. Air Force aircraft and were greeted by Taiwan Foreign Minister Joseph Wu.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taipei.
  2. A former county of Taiwan, which became New Taipei City. [from 20th c.]
    • 2008, Freiberger, Scott B., “Taiwan From A to Z”, in Taipei in a Day[10], →ISBN, OCLC 427567606, page 123, column 1:
      A century ago, the cities of Taipei County were rustic faming societies made up of mostly aboriginal tribes. After the Nationalists retreated to Taiwan in 1949 the area met with a vast influx of Chinese immigrants, and during the 1950s and 1960s small manufacturing facilities began appearing. Taipei County has since become a Taiwanese melting pot of sorts as young people relocate from overseas and southern parts of the island for advanced schooling and settle in the area.
    • 2011 March, Kelly, Robert; Joshua Samuel Brown, “Northern Taiwan”, in Taiwan (Lonely Planet)‎[11], 8th edition, →ISBN, OCLC 770615940, OL 27127374M, page 120, column 1:
      C is for Ceramics. C is for - Yingge? Well, not quite, but ‘Yingge is for ceramics’ is something almost any Taiwanese can chant. This little town in the very southern part of Taipei County lives by and for the production of high- and low-quality ceramic and pottery objects: everything from cupboard handles to Song-dynasty vases.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taipei.
  3. (metonymically) The government of the Republic of China (Taiwan). [from 20th c.]
    • 1992, Nixon, Richard, “The Pacific Triangle”, in Seize the Moment[12], Simon & Schuster, →ISBN, LCCN 91-37743, OCLC 440652941, page 181:
      In the Shanghai Communiqué of 1972, we recognized the fact that both Beijing and Taipei viewed Taiwan as part of China but unequivocally expressed our support for a peaceful settlement of the unification issue. While we should not alter the fundamental pillars of our policy, we should consider certain steps that will raise Taiwan's international standing.
    • 2003, “Decisive Dates”, in Vivien Kim, editor, Taiwan (Insight Guides)‎[13], →ISBN, OCLC 1028406778, page 19, column 2:
      1993 The first official governmental contacts between Taipei and Beijing take place in Singapore.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taipei.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The choice between the Hanyu Pinyin-derived name Taibei and the Wade–Giles-derived name Taipei may be interpreted as having political overtones.
  • Since the end of World War II, the city has almost universally been known as Taipei.[2] The Taiwan (ROC) government's official name for the city is Taipei, and has been adopted by geographic naming databases, international organizations, and by many other reference sources.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Leon E. Seltzer, editor (1952), “Taipei, Taipeh, or T'ai-pei”, in The Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World[1], Morningside Heights, NY: Columbia University Press, page 1864, column 3
  2. ^ Alka Acharya; G. P. Deshpande (December 2002), “A Taibei Diary”, in Economic and Political Weekly[2], volume 37, issue 49, Mumbai, JSTOR 4412929, page 4904, column 1: “The whole world spells the name of the capital of Taiwan with a 'p' rather than a 'b'.”

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Proper noun[edit]

Taipei m

  1. Taipei (a city in Taiwan)

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Proper noun[edit]

Taipei ?

  1. Taipei (a city in Taiwan)

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

Taipei

  1. Rōmaji transcription of たいぺい
  2. Rōmaji transcription of タイペイ

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: Tai‧pei

Proper noun[edit]

Taipei m

  1. Alternative form of Taipé