babble

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English babelen, from Old English *bæblian, also wæflian ‎(to talk foolishly), from Proto-Germanic *babalōną ‎(to chatter), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰa-bʰa-, *baba- ‎(to talk vaguely, mumble). Cognate with Old Frisian babbelje ‎(to babble), Old Norse babbla ‎(to babble) (Swedish babbla), Middle Low German babbelen ‎(to babble), Dutch babbelen ‎(to babble), German pappeln and babbeln ‎(to babble).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

babble ‎(uncountable)

  1. Idle talk; senseless prattle; gabble; twaddle.
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus, a Mask, line 823:
    • "This is mere moral babble."
  2. Inarticulate speech; constant or confused murmur.
    • The babble of our young children. - Darwin.
  3. A sound like that of water gently flowing around obstructions.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

babble ‎(third-person singular simple present babbles, present participle babbling, simple past and past participle babbled)

  1. (intransitive) To utter words indistinctly or unintelligibly; to utter inarticulate sounds; as, a child babbles.
  2. (intransitive) To talk incoherently; to utter unmeaning words.
  3. (intransitive) To talk much; to chatter; to prate.
  4. (intransitive) To make a continuous murmuring noise, as shallow water running over stones.
    Hounds are said to babble, or to be babbling, when they are too noisy after having found a good scent.
  5. (transitive) To utter in an indistinct or incoherent way; to repeat, as words, in a childish way without understanding.
  6. (transitive) To disclose by too free talk, as a secret.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

babble

  1. First-person singular present of babbeln.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of babbeln.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of babbeln.
  4. Imperative singular of babbeln.