mala

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See also: mála, malá, màla, malā, måla, and mała

Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mala (jaw, cheek).

Noun[edit]

mala (plural malae)

  1. A single lobe of an insect's maxilla.
  2. The grinding surface of an insect's mandible.

Etymology 2[edit]

See malum.

Noun[edit]

mala

  1. plural of malum

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Sanskrit माला (mālā, wreath, garland, crown).

Noun[edit]

mala (plural malas or mala)

  1. A bead or a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity.
Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Breton[edit]

Verb[edit]

mala

  1. to grind

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mala f sg

  1. feminine singular of mal

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmala/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧la
  • Rhymes: -ala

Adjective[edit]

mala (accusative singular malan, plural malaj, accusative plural malajn)

  1. opposite

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mala, from Proto-Germanic *malaną.

Verb[edit]

mala (third person singular past indicative mól, third person plural past indicative mólu, supine malið)

  1. to grind

Conjugation[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mala, from Proto-Germanic *malaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mala (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative malaði, supine malað)

  1. to grind
    Hættu mala kornið!
    Stop grinding the corn!
  2. to purr
    Oo, hlustiði á köttinn mala.
    Oh, listen to the cat purr.
  3. to blabber, babble, talk
    Hann hættir bara ekki mala.
    He just won't stop babbling!

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mala

  1. bad

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish mala.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala f (genitive singular mala, nominative plural malaí)

  1. brow
    1. (anatomy) eyebrow
    2. (geography, of hill) brow; slope, incline

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mala mhala not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "mala" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • mala” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala f (plural male)

  1. underworld, gangland

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *smakslā, from Proto-Indo-European *smek- (beard) as *smḱ- (beard) +‎ *slo/h₂-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

māla f (genitive mālae); first declension

  1. (anatomy) cheekbone, jaw
  2. cheek
    Tam consimile'st atque ego: sūra, pēs, statūra, tōnsus, oculī, nāsus, vel labra, mālae, mentum, barba, collum - tōtus! (Platus, Amphitryo, Act 1, 443-445)
    He's so similar to me: his calves, feet, height, haircut, eyes, nose, lips, jaw, chin, beard, neck - all of it!
Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative māla mālae
genitive mālae mālārum
dative mālae mālīs
accusative mālam mālās
ablative mālā mālīs
vocative māla mālae
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • mala in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mala in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mala in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “mala”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • mala” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be broken down by misfortune: in malis iacere
    • (ambiguous) to be hard pressed by misfortune: malis urgeri
    • (ambiguous) to have a good or bad reputation, be spoken well, ill of: bona, mala existimatio est de aliquo
    • (ambiguous) moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • (ambiguous) to take a thing in good (bad) part: in bonam (malam) partem accipere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) a guilty conscience: conscientia mala or peccatorum, culpae, sceleris, delicti
    • (ambiguous) to be tormented by remorse: conscientia mala angi, excruciari
    • (ambiguous) to bless (curse) a person: precari alicui bene (male) or omnia bona (mala), salutem
    • (ambiguous) from beginning to end: ab ovo usque ad mala (proverb.)
  • mala in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Frankish *malha (leather bag).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala f (genitive malae); first declension

  1. bundle, bag
Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mala malae
genitive malae malārum
dative malae malīs
accusative malam malās
ablative malā malīs
vocative mala malae

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mala

  1. inflection of malus:
    1. feminine nominative singular
    2. feminine vocative singular
    3. neuter nominative plural
    4. neuter accusative plural
    5. neuter vocative plural

malā

  1. feminine ablative singular of malus

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala n pl

  1. inflection of malum:
    1. nominative plural
    2. accusative plural
    3. vocative plural

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

māla n pl

  1. inflection of mālum:
    1. nominative plural
    2. accusative plural
    3. vocative plural

Latvian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala f (4th declension)

  1. edge, shore

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mala

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of malt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of malt

Lithuanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mãla

  1. third-person singular present tense of malti.
  2. third-person plural present tense of malti.

Margi[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala

  1. woman

References[edit]

  • Carl Hoffmann, A grammar of the Margi language (1963)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse mala.

Verb[edit]

mala (present tense mel, past tense mol, past participle male, present participle malande, imperative mal)

  1. to grind
  2. to make a grinding sound, e.g. to purr (of a cat)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

mala (present tense malar, past tense mala, past participle mala, passive infinitive malast, present participle malande, imperative mala/mal)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by måla, to paint

References[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *malaną, whence also Old Saxon malan, Old High German malan, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌻𐌰𐌽 (malan).

Verb[edit]

mala (singular past indicative mól, plural past indicative mólu, past participle malinn)

  1. to grind
  2. to make a grinding sound, e.g. to purr (of a cat)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • mala in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mala in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mala in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “mala”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be broken down by misfortune: in malis iacere
    • (ambiguous) to be hard pressed by misfortune: malis urgeri
    • (ambiguous) to have a good or bad reputation, be spoken well, ill of: bona, mala existimatio est de aliquo
    • (ambiguous) moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • (ambiguous) to take a thing in good (bad) part: in bonam (malam) partem accipere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) a guilty conscience: conscientia mala or peccatorum, culpae, sceleris, delicti
    • (ambiguous) to be tormented by remorse: conscientia mala angi, excruciari
    • (ambiguous) to bless (curse) a person: precari alicui bene (male) or omnia bona (mala), salutem
    • (ambiguous) from beginning to end: ab ovo usque ad mala (proverb.)
  • mala in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mala, from Proto-Germanic *malaną.

Verb[edit]

mala

  1. to grind

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala n

  1. impurity
  2. stain
  3. rust
  4. dirt
  5. dung

Declension[edit]


Pitjantjatjara[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala

  1. rufous hare-wallaby (Lagorchestes hirsutus)

References[edit]

  • Paul A. Eckert (2007) Pitjantjatjara / Yankunytjatjara Picture Dictionary[3], IAD Press, ISBN 1864650869

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French malle (large suitcase; trunk), from Middle French malle, from Old French male (leather bag, leather or wooden travel-case), from Frankish *malha (leather bag), from Proto-Germanic *malhō (leather bag), from Proto-Indo-European *molko- (leather bag).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala f (plural malas)

  1. suitcase
  2. (travel) luggage
  3. (automotive) boot, trunk
  4. (chiefly Portugal) handbag
  5. (idiomatic) An irritating person.

Synonyms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish mala.

Noun[edit]

mala f (genitive singular mala, plural malaichean)

  1. brow
    1. (anatomy) eyebrow
    2. (geography, of hill) brow; slope, incline

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mala mhala
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • mala” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Sicilian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin malus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈma.la/
  • Hyphenation: mà‧la

Adjective[edit]

mala f sg

  1. feminine singular of malu; bad.

Inflection[edit]

Masculine Feminine
Singular malu mala
Plural mali mali

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mala, feminine of malus.

Adjective[edit]

mala f sg

  1. Feminine singular of adjective malo.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French malle (large suitcase; trunk), from Middle French malle, from Old French male (leather bag, leather or wooden travel-case), from Frankish *malha (leather bag), from Proto-Germanic *malhō (leather bag), from Proto-Indo-European *molko- (leather bag).

Noun[edit]

mala f (plural malas)

  1. suitcase
  2. mailbag
  3. mail, post
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish mala, from Old Norse mala, from Proto-Germanic *malaną.

Verb[edit]

mala (present mal, preterite malde, supine malt, imperative mal)

  1. to grind; to make smaller
  2. to speak ceaselessly, usually about one single subject

Usage notes[edit]

  • Alternate form for the present tense: mal, and alternate form for the past participle (which only exist in the sense of grinding): malen.

Conjugation[edit]


Tuvaluan[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala

  1. plague

Wolof[edit]

Noun[edit]

mala (definite form mala mi)

  1. animal