malum

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin malum

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

malum ‎(plural malums)

  1. an evil or wrongdoing.

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From malus(evil, wicked).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

malum

  1. nominative neuter singular of malus
  2. accusative masculine singular of malus
  3. accusative neuter singular of malus
  4. vocative neuter singular of malus

Noun[edit]

malum n ‎(genitive malī); second declension

  1. an evil, misfortune, calamity
  2. harm, injury
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative malum mala
genitive malī malōrum
dative malō malīs
accusative malum mala
ablative malō malīs
vocative malum mala

Descendants[edit]

Interjection[edit]

malum!

  1. damn!, fuck!, alas!, misery!
    • c. 254 BCE – 184 BCE, Plautus, Menaechmi 2.3.389.390
      Erotium: Certo, tibi et parasito tuo.
      Sosicles: Quoi, malum, parasito? Certo haec mulier non sana est satis.
      Certainly you did, for yourself and your parasite."
      "For whom? Fuck, parasite? Surely this woman isn't quite right in her senses.

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

mālum (an apple)

From Ancient Greek μῆλον(mêlon, tree, fruit), specifically μᾶλον(mâlon) (Doric, Aeolic).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mālum n ‎(genitive mālī); second declension

  1. apple (fruit)
  2. the plant Aristolochia
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mālum māla
genitive mālī mālōrum
dative mālō mālīs
accusative mālum māla
ablative mālō mālīs
vocative mālum māla
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • malum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • malum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • MALUM in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.malum”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be broken down by misfortune: in malis iacere
    • (ambiguous) to be hard pressed by misfortune: malis urgeri
    • (ambiguous) to deserve ill of a person; to treat badly: male mereri de aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to have a good or bad reputation, be spoken well, ill of: bene, male audire (ab aliquo)
    • (ambiguous) to have a good or bad reputation, be spoken well, ill of: bona, mala existimatio est de aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to inculcate good (bad) principles: bene (male) praecipere alicui
    • (ambiguous) moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • (ambiguous) my mind forebodes misfortune: animus praesāgit malum
    • (ambiguous) my mind forebodes misfortune: animo praesagio malum
    • (ambiguous) a guilty conscience: conscientia mala or peccatorum, culpae, sceleris, delicti
    • (ambiguous) a guilty conscience: animus male sibi conscius
    • (ambiguous) to be tormented by remorse: conscientia mala angi, excruciari
    • (ambiguous) a moral (immoral) man: homo bene (male) moratus
    • (ambiguous) to bless (curse) a person: precari alicui bene (male) or omnia bona (mala), salutem
    • (ambiguous) to manage one's affairs, household, property well or ill: rem bene (male) gerere (vid. sect. XVI. 10a)
    • (ambiguous) from beginning to end: ab ovo usque ad mala (proverb.)
    • (ambiguous) to buy dearly: magno or male emere
    • (ambiguous) to win, lose a fight (of the commander): rem (bene, male) gerere (vid. sect. XII. 2, note rem gerere...)
    • (ambiguous) I am sorry to hear..: male (opp. bene) narras (de)