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From Proto-Indo-European *wi-tyo-, from *wey- ‎(guilt, vice, fault).



vitium n ‎(genitive vitiī); second declension

  1. crime
  2. vice
  3. fault, defect, blemish, error


Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative vitium vitia
genitive vitiī vitiōrum
dative vitiō vitiīs
accusative vitium vitia
ablative vitiō vitiīs
vocative vitium vitia

Derived terms[edit]



  • vitium in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vitium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • VITIUM in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • vitium” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a mistake, solecism: vitium orationis, sermonis or simply vitium
    • to be indulgent to a person's faults: indulgere vitiis alicuius
    • to be virtuous: virtute praeditum, ornatum esse (opp. vitiis obrutum esse)
    • his vices betray themselves: vitia erumpunt (in aliquem) (De Amic. 21. 76)
    • to abandon oneself to vice: animum vitiis dedere
    • to be tainted with vice: vitiis, sceleribus contaminari or se contaminare (Off. 3. 8. 37)
    • to be vicious, criminal: vitiis, sceleribus inquinatum, contaminatum, obrutum esse
    • to eradicate vice: vitia exstirpare et funditus tollere
    • a life defiled by every crime: vita omnibus flagitiis, vitiis dedita
    • to have a natural propensity to vice: natura proclivem esse ad vitia
    • (ambiguous) the word aemulatio is employed with two meanings, in a good and a bad sense: aemulatio dupliciter dicitur, ut et in laude et in vitio hoc nomen sit
    • (ambiguous) to be free from faults: omni vitio carere
    • (ambiguous) magistrates elected irregularly (i.e. either when the auspices have been unfavourable or when some formality has been neglected): magistratus vitio creati
    • (ambiguous) to reproach, blame a person for..: aliquid alicui crimini dare, vitio vertere (Verr. 5. 50)