melo

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perhaps after French mélo.[1]

Noun[edit]

melo (countable and uncountable, plural melos)

  1. (informal, Britain) Abbreviation of melodrama.
    • 1889 December 24, Ernest Dowson, “To Arthur Moore”, in Desmond Flower, Henry Maas, editors, The Letters of Ernest Dowson, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, published 1967, →LCCN, page 121:
      Bar burlesque & Penleyan comedy I am becoming tolerant of this insipid British drama. Even bad melo doesn’t cause me to vomit as it did of old.
    • 1920 April 23, Aldous Huxley, “To Arnold Bennett”, in Grover Smith, editor, Letters of Aldous Huxley, London: Chatto & Windus, published 1969, page 183:
      One is a melodrama about Bolshevism—the break up of the Armies in 1917—what one wd call a West End melodrama as opposed to a Lyceum melo.
    • 1923, Terry Ramsaye, “The Romantic History of the Motion Picture”, in Photoplay, page 41:
      She learned to read and write on the road and between scenes backstage, under the tutorship of the “female heavy” of a melodrama company. Meanwhile Mary listened and learned of the world about her. She heard a very great deal of the chesty gossip of melo actors discussing “when I was with Belasco,” and came to learn that on this wonderful Broadway Belasco was master.
    • 1971 August 26, Radio Times:
      True life was melo about the first woman the George Cross. (As a stump word, ‘melo’ is short for ‘melodrama’.)
    • 1973 December 20, Radio Times:
      The Roots of Heaven..John Huston’s melo about elephant conservation.
    • 2012, Bill Thomas, Upstage, Downstage, Cross: An Actor Emerges in Early English 20th Century Theatre, AuthorHouse, →ISBN, page 155:
      “And a melo?” Miss Collins asked. Richard looked to Miss Joyce for help. “A melodrama! You don’t know?” A somewhat astonished Miss Joyce commented. “The only plays melo companies perform are melodramas. There are several of them touring out there,” broadly gesturing with her arm. “They’re known as ‘blood and thunders.’ A good melo actor can work all year round. [] Melos are a good place for a young actor to start,” she added.

References[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

Etymology[edit]

From Latin meles.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈmelo]
  • Rhymes: -elo
  • Hyphenation: me‧lo
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

melo (accusative singular melon, plural meloj, accusative plural melojn)

  1. badger

Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

melo

  1. inflection of meloa:
    1. present active indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular present imperative
    3. second-person singular present active imperative connegative

Anagrams[edit]

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin melus, from Latin mālus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈme.lo/
  • Rhymes: -elo
  • Hyphenation: mé‧lo

Noun[edit]

melo m (plural meli)

  1. apple tree, apple
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mélo1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek μέλος (mélos).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɛ.lo/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlo
  • Hyphenation: mè‧lo

Noun[edit]

melo m (plural meli)

  1. (literary, obsolete) song; poetry

Further reading[edit]

  • mèlo in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Attested since about late 4th century CE, since Palladius and author(s) of Historia Augusta. Seems to be a colloquial shortening of mēlopepō, from Ancient Greek μηλοπέπων (mēlopépōn, melon), probably with influence from μῆλον (mêlon, apple). See mālum and mālus

Noun[edit]

mēlō m (genitive mēlōnis); third declension (Late Latin)

  1. Some cucurbit, likely an apple-shaped melon.
    • c. 500 CE, Palladius, Opus agriculturae 4.9.5:
      Nunc melones serendi rarius: distent inter se semina pedibus duobus, locis subactis, vel pastinatis, maxime arenis.
      Now melons are to be sown more rarely: let the seeds be two feet distant, in places well wrought and pastinated, especially in sandy soils.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mēlō mēlōnēs
Genitive mēlōnis mēlōnum
Dative mēlōnī mēlōnibus
Accusative mēlōnem mēlōnēs
Ablative mēlōne mēlōnibus
Vocative mēlō mēlōnēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • mēlo”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • melo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • melo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

melo

  1. inflection of melot:
    1. second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person plural present indicative
    3. second-person singular imperative
  2. (with the particle lai) third-person singular imperative of melot
  3. (with the particle lai) third-person plural imperative of melot

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *melu.

Noun[edit]

melo n

  1. flour

Descendants[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

melo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of melar

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Participle[edit]

melo (Cyrillic spelling мело)

  1. neuter singular active past participle of mesti