badger

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See also: Badger

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bageard (marked by a badge), from bage (badge), referring to the animal's badge-like white blaze, equivalent to badge +‎ -ard.

Noun[edit]

badger (plural badgers)

  1. Any mammal of three subfamilies, which belong to the family Mustelidae: Melinae (Eurasian badgers), Mellivorinae (ratel or honey badger), and Taxideinae (American badger).
  2. A native or resident of the American state, Wisconsin.
  3. (obsolete) A brush made of badger hair.
  4. (in the plural, obsolete, cant) A crew of desperate villains who robbed near rivers, into which they threw the bodies of those they murdered.
Synonyms[edit]
Holonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Terms derived from badger (noun)
Translations[edit]
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References[edit]

Verb[edit]

badger (third-person singular simple present badgers, present participle badgering, simple past and past participle badgered)

  1. To pester, to annoy persistently; press.
    He kept badgering her about her bad habits.
  2. (Britain, slang) To pass gas; to fart. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
Synonyms[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown (Possibly from "bagger". "Baggier" is cited by the OED in 1467-8)

Noun[edit]

badger (plural badgers)

  1. (obsolete) An itinerant licensed dealer in commodities used for food; a hawker; a huckster; -- formerly applied especially to one who bought grain in one place and sold it in another.
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Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English badge.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

badger

  1. to use an identity badge
    Avant de quitter la pièce, il ne faudra pas oublier de badger.

Conjugation[edit]

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written badge- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.