vulnus

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Maybe from Proto-Indo-European *welh₂-(to tear up). Cognate with Latin vellō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vulnus n ‎(genitive vulneris); third declension

  1. wound, injury

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative vulnus vulnera
genitive vulneris vulnerum
dative vulnerī vulneribus
accusative vulnus vulnera
ablative vulnere vulneribus
vocative vulnus vulnera

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • vulnus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • VULNUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.vulnus”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to wound a person (also used metaphorically): vulnus infligere alicui
    • to be (seriously, mortally) wounded: vulnus (grave, mortiferum) accipere, excipere
    • after many had been wounded on both sides: multis et illatis et acceptis vulneribus (B. G. 1. 50)
    • weakened by wounds: vulneribus confectus
    • to open an old wound: refricare vulnus, cicatricem obductam
    • to die of wounds: ex vulnere mori (Fam. 10. 33)
    • the victory cost much blood and many wounds, was very dearly bought: victoria multo sanguine ac vulneribus stetit (Liv. 23. 30)
    • (ambiguous) wounds (scars) on the breast: vulnera (cicatrices) adversa (opp. aversa)
    • (ambiguous) wounds (scars) on the breast: vulnera adverso corpore accepta