battle

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See also: Battle

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbætəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbætl̩/, [ˈbæɾɫ̩], [bætɫ̩]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætəl
  • Hyphenation: bat‧tle

Etymology 1[edit]

From Early Modern English batell, probably from Middle English *batel ‎(flourishing), from Old English *batol ‎(improving, tending to be good), from batian ‎(to get better, improve), from Proto-Germanic *batjaną, *bōtijaną ‎(to improve, atone, be favourable), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰAd- ‎(good) +‎ -le. Related to West Frisian bate, baatsje ‎(to get better), Dutch baten ‎(to benefit, avail, profit), Low German batten ‎(to be sly). Compare batten ‎(to improve, become better, fatten, flourish). More at better.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

battle ‎(comparative more battle, superlative most battle)

  1. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England, agriculture) Improving; nutritious; fattening.
    battle grass, battle pasture
  2. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) Fertile; fruitful.
    battle soil, battle land
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

battle ‎(third-person singular simple present battles, present participle battling, simple past and past participle battled)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) To nourish; feed.
  2. (transitive, Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) To render fertile or fruitful, as in soil.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English batel, from Old French bataille, from Vulgar Latin *battālia, from Late Latin battuālia ‎(fighting and fencing exercises), from Latin battuō ‎(to strike, beat), from Gaulish (compare Welsh bathu ‎(to strike money, coin, mint)), from Proto-Indo-European *bhau(t)- ‎(to knock) (compare Latin fatuus ‎(silly, knocked silly), Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐌸𐍃 ‎(bauþs, deaf, numb, dumbstruck)).

Displaced native Old English hild ‎(battle), Old English beadu ‎(battle, war).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • batail (14th - 16th centuries)

Noun[edit]

battle ‎(plural battles)

  1. A general action, fight, or encounter, in which all the divisions of an army are or may be engaged; an engagement; a combat.
  2. A struggle; a contest.
    the battle of life
    • (Can we date this quote?) Henry Morley (1822-1894):
      The whole intellectual battle that had at its centre the best poem of the best poet of that day.
    • 2011 November 3, Chris Bevan, “Rubin Kazan 1-0 Tottenham”, BBC Sport:
      In truth, Tottenham never really looked like taking all three points and this defeat means they face a battle to reach the knockout stages—with their next home game against PAOK Salonika on 30 November likely to prove decisive.
    • 2012, Clive James 'near the end' in cancer battle, ITV News, 21 June 2012:
      Australian broadcaster Clive James has admitted that he is losing his long-fought battle with leukaemia.
  3. (now rare) A division of an army; a battalion.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book II, chapter x:
      THenne kyng Arthur made redy his hoost in x batails and Nero was redy in the felde afore the castel Tarabil with a grete hoost / & he had x batails with many mo peple than Arthur had
    • (Can we date this quote?) Francis Bacon (1561-1626):
      The king divided his army into three battles.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Robertson (1721-1793):
      The cavalry, by way of distinction, was called the battle, and on it alone depended the fate of every action.
    • 2000, George RR Martin, A Storm of Swords, Bantam 2011, page 634:
      ‘I will have more than twelve thousand men. I mean to divide them into three battles and start up the causeway a half-day apart.’
  4. (obsolete) The main body, as distinct from the vanguard and rear; battalia.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hayward to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

battle ‎(third-person singular simple present battles, present participle battling, simple past and past participle battled)

  1. (intransitive) To join in battle; to contend in fight; as, to battle over theories.
    She has been battling against cancer for years.
  2. (transitive) To assail in battle; to fight or struggle.
    She has been battling cancer for years.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]