pugna

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: pugná

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pugna, from pugnō (I fight, oppose), from pugnus (fist), from Proto-Indo-European *pewǵ- (prick, punch).

Noun[edit]

pugna f (plural pugne) (obsolete, literary, poetic)

  1. (literally and figuratively) fight, battle, combat
  2. dispute, quarrel

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

pugna (obsolete)

  1. plural of pugno
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno, Le Monnier (1994), Canto VI, p. 91, vv. 25-27:
      E 'l duca mio distese le sue spanne, ¶ prese la terra, e con piene le pugna, ¶ la gittò dentro a le bramose canne.
      And my Conductor, with his spans extended, ¶ took of the earth, and with his fists well filled, ¶ he threw it into those rapacious gullets.

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

pugna

  1. inflection of pugnare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From pugnō (to fight), from pugnus (a fist).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pugna f (genitive pugnae); first declension

  1. a fight, battle, combat, action
    Synonyms: proelium, bellum, duellum, dimicatio, certamen
  2. a line of battle, troops drawn up for battle
  3. a contest, dispute, quarrel
    Synonyms: certatus, rixa
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pugna pugnae
Genitive pugnae pugnārum
Dative pugnae pugnīs
Accusative pugnam pugnās
Ablative pugnā pugnīs
Vocative pugna pugnae
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

pugnā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of pugnō

References[edit]

  • pugna”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pugna”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pugna in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pugna in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to provoke the enemy to battle: proelio (ad pugnam) hostes lacessere, provocare
    • to decline battle: pugnam detrectare (Liv. 3. 60)
    • to choose suitable ground for an engagement: locum ad pugnam idoneum deligere
    • to fix a day for the engagement: diem pugnae constituere (B. G. 3. 24)
    • to triumph over some one: triumphum agere de or ex aliquo or c. Gen. (victoriae, pugnae)
    • to fight a battle at sea: pugnam navalem facere
    • (ambiguous) the issue of the day was for a long time uncertain: diu anceps stetit pugna
    • (ambiguous) to come off victorious: superiorem (opp. inferiorem), victorem (proelio, pugna) discedere

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pugna.

Noun[edit]

pugna f (plural pugnas)

  1. combat; battle; fight
    Synonyms: batalha, combate, luta, peleja
  2. (figuratively) struggle
    Synonyms: batalha, luta

Verb[edit]

pugna

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of pugnar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of pugnar

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pugna f (plural pugnas)

  1. fight; ruckus
  2. struggle
  3. battle

Verb[edit]

pugna

  1. inflection of pugnar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]