bate

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See also: Bate, baté, bâté, bâte, and bäte

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Aphetic form of abate

Verb[edit]

bate (third-person singular simple present bates, present participle bating, simple past and past participle bated)

  1. (transitive) To reduce the force of something; to abate.
  2. (transitive) To restrain, usually with the sense of being in anticipation
  3. (transitive, sometimes figuratively) To cut off, remove, take away.
    • c. 1658, Dr. Henry More, Government of the Tongue:
      He will not bate an ace of absolute certainty.
  4. (archaic, transitive) To leave out, except, bar.
  5. To waste away.
  6. To deprive of.
    • 1633 (first published) George Herbert, The Church Porch
      When baseness is exalted, do not bate / The place its honour for the person's sake.
  7. To lessen by retrenching, deducting, or reducing; to abate; to beat down; to lower.
    • 1691, [John Locke], Some Considerations of the Consequences of the Lowering of Interest, and Raising the Value of Money. [], London: [] Awnsham and John Churchill, [], published 1692, OCLC 933799310:
      when the landholder's rent falls, he must either bate the labourer's wages , or not employ, or not pay him
  8. To allow by way of abatement or deduction.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1897 Universal Dictionary of the English Language, Robert Hunter and Charles Morris (editors), volume 1, page 459.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate (uncountable)

  1. Strife; contention.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 2:
      ... and wears his boots very smooth, like unto the sign of the leg, and breeds no bate with telling of discreet stories;
    • 1888, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night (Arabian Nights)
      So the strife redoubled and the weapons together clashed and ceased not bate and debate and naught was to be seen but blood flowing and necks bowing; []
    • 1911, H.G. Wells, The New Machiavelli:
      The other merely needs jealousy and bate, of which there are great and easily accessible reservoirs in every human heart.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate (third-person singular simple present bates, present participle bating, simple past and past participle bated)

  1. (intransitive) To contend or strive with blows or arguments.
  2. (intransitive, falconry) Of a falcon: To flap the wings vigorously; to bait.
    • 1600, Francis Bacon, letter to Queen Elizabeth, upon the sending of a new-year's gift
      I am like a hawk , that bates , when I see occasion of service , but cannot fly because I am tied to another's fist
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

  • (to contend or strive with blows or arguments): bait.

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Swedish beta (maceration, tanning).

Noun[edit]

bate (plural bates)

  1. An alkaline lye which neutralizes the effect of the previous application of lime, and makes hides supple in the process of tanning.
    • 1888, Popular Science (volume 34, number 10, page 287)
      The process of unliming hides and skins in tanning has been a slow and disgusting one, consisting in soaking the skins in a bath of manure in water, called bate.
  2. A vat which contains this liquid.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate (third-person singular simple present bates, present participle bating, simple past and past participle bated)

  1. (transitive) To soak leather so as to remove chemicals used in tanning; to steep in bate.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1897 Universal Dictionary of the English Language, Robert Hunter and Charles Morris (editors), volume 1, page 459.

Etymology 4[edit]

Formed by analogy with eatate or other Class 5 strong verbs (compare gave, obsolete spake, etc.), with which it shares an analogous past participle (eatenbeaten).

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. (obsolete or nonstandard) simple past tense of beat; = beat.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Shortening of masturbate.

Verb[edit]

bate (third-person singular simple present bates, present participle bating, simple past and past participle bated)

  1. (intransitive, slang) To masturbate.
    I could go out and take a walk in the park, but I'd rather stay home and bate all day.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate m (plural bates)

  1. bat (club)

Crow[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. male-bodied person who dresses and lives as a woman

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of baten

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. (archaic) Dative singular form of baat

Anagrams[edit]


Garo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Alternative forms[edit]

Postposition[edit]

bate

  1. (follows dative case -na) more than
    angna bate dal·a
    bigger than me

Khumi Chin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. swelling

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[1], Payap University, page 74

Kitanemuk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uto-Aztecan *pa. Cognate with Serrano bate.

Noun[edit]

bāte

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Kroeber, Shoshonean Dialects of California, in University of California Publications: American archaeology and ethnology, volume 4, page 81

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. vocative singular of batus

Lindu[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. gravestone

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. Alternative form of bot (boat)

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of bater
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of bater

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin battere, variant of Latin battuere, present active infinitive of battuō (beat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

a bate (third-person singular present bate, past participle bătut3rd conj.

  1. to beat
  2. to defeat
  3. to strike, hit, punch

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. vocative singular of bat

Serrano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uto-Aztecan *pa.

Noun[edit]

bāte

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Kroeber, Shoshonean Dialects of California, in University of California Publications: American archaeology and ethnology, volume 4, page 81

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbate/, [ˈba.t̪e]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English bat.

Noun[edit]

bate m (plural bates)

  1. (sports) bat

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate m (plural bates)

  1. (Honduras, slang) reefer, joint (a marijuana cigarette)
    Synonyms: canuto, (Honduras) carruco, (Honduras) leño, porro, (Chile) pito

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of batir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of batir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of batir.

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French batre, from Late Latin battō, battere, alternative form of Latin battuō, battuere (beat, pound; fight).

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to fight