bate

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See also: Bate, baté, bâté, bâte, and bäte

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Aphetic from abate.

Verb[edit]

bate (third-person singular simple present bates, present participle bating, simple past and past participle bated)

  1. (transitive) To reduce the force of something; to abate.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dryden
      Abate thy speed, and I will bate of mine.
  2. (transitive) To restrain, usually with the sense of being in anticipation
  3. (transitive, sometimes figuratively) To cut off, remove, take away.
    • c. 1658, Dr. Henry More, Government of the Tongue:
      He will not bate an ace of absolute certainty.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Holland
      About autumn bate the earth from about the roots of olives, and lay them bare.
  4. (archaic, transitive) To leave out, except, bar.
  5. To waste away.
  6. To deprive of.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Herbert
      When baseness is exalted, do not bate / The place its honour for the person's sake.
  7. To lessen by retrenching, deducting, or reducing; to abate; to beat down; to lower.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Locke
      He must either bate the labourer's wages, or not employ or not pay him.
  8. To allow by way of abatement or deduction.
    • (Can we date this quote?) South
      to whom he bates nothing or what he stood upon with the parliament
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1897 Universal Dictionary of the English Language, Robert Hunter and Charles Morris (editors), volume 1, page 459.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate (uncountable)

  1. Strife; contention.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 2:
      ... and wears his boots very smooth, like unto the sign of the leg, and breeds no bate with telling of discreet stories;
    • 1888, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night (Arabian Nights)
      So the strife redoubled and the weapons together clashed and ceased not bate and debate and naught was to be seen but blood flowing and necks bowing; []
    • 1911, H.G. Wells, The New Machiavelli:
      The other merely needs jealousy and bate, of which there are great and easily accessible reservoirs in every human heart.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate (third-person singular simple present bates, present participle bating, simple past and past participle bated)

  1. (intransitive) To contend or strive with blows or arguments.
  2. (intransitive, falconry) Of a falcon: To flap the wings vigorously; to bait.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

  • (to contend or strive with blows or arguments): bait.

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowing from Swedish beta (maceration, tanning).

Noun[edit]

bate (plural bates)

  1. An alkaline lye which neutralizes the effect of the previous application of lime, and makes hides supple in the process of tanning.
    • 1888, Popular Science (volume 34, number 10, page 287)
      The process of unliming hides and skins in tanning has been a slow and disgusting one, consisting in soaking the skins in a bath of manure in water, called bate.
  2. A vat which contains this liquid.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate (third-person singular simple present bates, present participle bating, simple past and past participle bated)

  1. (transitive) To soak leather so as to remove chemicals used in tanning; to steep in bate.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1897 Universal Dictionary of the English Language, Robert Hunter and Charles Morris (editors), volume 1, page 459.

Etymology 4[edit]

Formed by analogy with eatate, with which it shares an analogous past participle (eatenbeaten).

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. (obsolete or nonstandard) simple past tense of beat; = beat.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Shortening of masturbate.

Verb[edit]

bate (third-person singular simple present bates, present participle bating, simple past and past participle bated)

  1. (intransitive, slang) To masturbate.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate m (plural bates)

  1. bat (club)

Crow[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. male-bodied person who dresses and lives as a woman

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of baten

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. (archaic) Dative singular form of baat

Anagrams[edit]


Kitanemuk[edit]

Noun[edit]

bāte

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Kroeber, Shoshonean Dialects of California, in University of California Publications: American archaeology and ethnology, volume 4, page 81

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate

  1. vocative singular of batus

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of bater
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of bater

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin battere, variant of Latin battuere, present active infinitive of battuō (beat).

Verb[edit]

a bate (third-person singular present bate, past participle bătut3rd conj.

  1. to beat
  2. to defeat
  3. to strike, hit, punch

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Serrano[edit]

Noun[edit]

bāte

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Kroeber, Shoshonean Dialects of California, in University of California Publications: American archaeology and ethnology, volume 4, page 81

Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English bat.

Noun[edit]

bate m (plural bates)

  1. (sports) bat

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bate m (plural bates)

  1. (Honduras, slang) reefer, joint (a marijuana cigarette).
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of batir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of batir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of batir.

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French batre, from Late Latin battō, battere, alternative form of Latin battuō, battuere (beat, pound; fight).

Verb[edit]

bate

  1. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to fight