bait

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See also: bàit

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bait, beite, from Old Norse beita ‎(food, bait), from Proto-Germanic *baitō ‎(that which is bitten, bait), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- ‎(to cleave, split, separate). Cognate with German Beize ‎(mordant, corrosive fluid; marinade; hunting), Old English bāt ‎(that which can be bitten, food, bait). Related to bite.

Noun[edit]

bait ‎(plural baits)

  1. Any substance, especially food, used in catching fish, or other animals, by alluring them to a hook, snare, trap, or net.
  2. Food containing poison or a harmful additive to kill animals that are pests.
  3. Anything which allures; a lure; enticement; temptation.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairfax to this entry?)
  4. A portion of food or drink, as a refreshment taken on a journey; also, a stop for rest and refreshment.
    • 1818, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, chapter 20 page 70
      The tediousness of a two hours' bait at Petty-France, in which there was nothing to be done but to eat without being hungry, and loiter about without any thing to see, next followed[…]
    1. (Geordie) A packed lunch
    2. (East Anglia) A small meal taken mid-morning while farming
    3. (Northern England) A miner's packed meal.
  5. A light or hasty luncheon.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
References[edit]
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[2]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165

Verb[edit]

bait ‎(third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (transitive) To attract with bait; to entice.
  2. (transitive) To affix bait to a trap or a fishing hook or fishing line.
    • Washington Irving
      a crooked pin [] bailed with a vile earthworm

Translations[edit]

Usage notes[edit]
  • This verb is sometimes confused in writing with the rare verb bate, which is pronounced identically; in particular, the expression with bated breath is frequently misspelled *with baited breath by writers unfamiliar with the verb bate.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English baiten, beiten, from Old Norse beita ‎(to bait, cause to bite, feed, hunt), from Proto-Germanic *baitijaną ‎(to cause to bite, bridle), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- ‎(to cleave, split, separate). Cognate with Icelandic beita ‎(to bait), Swedish beta ‎(to bait, pasture, graze), German beizen ‎(to cause to bite, bait), Old English bǣtan ‎(to bait, hunt, bridle, bit).

Verb[edit]

bait ‎(third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (transitive) To set dogs on (an animal etc.) to bite or worry; to attack with dogs, especially for sport.
    to bait a bear with dogs;  to bait a bull
  2. (transitive) To intentionally annoy, torment, or threaten by constant rebukes or threats; to harass.
  3. (transitive, now rare) To feed and water (a horse or other animal), especially during a journey.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Bk.V, Ch.ix:
      And than they com into a lowe medow that was full of swete floures, and there thes noble knyghtes bayted her horses.
  4. (intransitive) Of a horse or other animal: to take food, especially during a journey.
  5. To stop to take a portion of food and drink for refreshment during a journey.
    • Milton
      Evil news rides post, while good news baits.
    • Evelyn
      My lord's coach conveyed me to Bury, and thence baiting at Newmarket.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

French battre de l'aile or des ailes, to flap or flutter.

Verb[edit]

bait ‎(third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To flap the wings; to flutter as if to fly; or to hover, as a hawk when she stoops to her prey.
    • Shakespeare
      Kites that bait and beat.

Anagrams[edit]


Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic بَيْت ‎(bayt), from Proto-Semitic *bayt-.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bait ‎(Jawi spelling بيت)

  1. house (abode)
  2. home (house or structure in which someone lives)

Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bait

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperfect subjunctive of bod

Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bait fait mait unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.