snare

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Snare

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English snare, from Old English sneare (a string; cord), from Proto-Germanic *snarhǭ (a sling; loop; noose). Cognate with Old Norse snara. Also related to German Schnur and Dutch snaar,snoer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

snare (plural snares)

Bird caught in a snare
Drum fitted with snare wires
  1. A trap (especially one made from a loop of wire, string, or leather).
    • 1943, Graham Greene, The Ministry of Fear, London: Heinemann, 1960, Book Three, Chapter One, pp. 196-197,[1]
      He [] watched Beavis’s long-toothed mouth open and clap to like a rabbit snare.
    • 2013, Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, New York: Knopf, 2014, Chapter 18, p. 332,[2]
      He felt a snare tightening around his throat; he gasped and threw a leg out of the bed, where it jerked for a second or two, thumping the steel frame, and died.
  2. A mental or psychological trap.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act IV, Scene 2,[3]
      If thou retire, the Dauphin, well appointed,
      Stands with the snares of war to tangle thee:
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Exodus 23.33,[4]
      [] if thou serve their gods, it will surely be a snare unto thee.
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, London: W. Taylor, p. 193,[5]
      [] and I had now liv’d two Years under these Uneasinesses, which indeed made my Life much less comfortable than it was before; as may well be imagin’d by any who know what it is to live in the constant Snare of the Fear of Man []
    • 1865, Elizabeth Gaskell, Wives and Daughters, Chapter ,[6]
      [] riches are a great snare.”
    • 1978, Jan Morris, Farewell the Trumpets: An Imperial Retreat, New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Part One, Chapter 9, p. 173,[7]
      They were devious war aims, and Allenby’s campaign was fought with a maximum of snare and subterfuge.
  3. (veterinary) A loop of cord used in obstetric cases, to hold or to pull a fetus from the mother animal.
  4. (music) A set of stiff wires held under tension against the lower skin of a drum to create a rattling sound.
  5. (music) A snare drum.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

snare (third-person singular simple present snares, present participle snaring, simple past and past participle snared)

  1. To catch or hold, especially with a loop.
    • Milton
      Lest that too heavenly form [] snare them.
    • Shakespeare
      The mournful crocodile / With sorrow snares relenting passengers.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

snare

  1. definite singular of snar
  2. plural form of snar

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adjective[edit]

snare

  1. definite singular of snar
  2. plural form of snar

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

snare

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of snar.