snare

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See also: Snare and SNARE

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English snare, from Old English snearu, sneare (a string; cord), from Proto-Germanic *snarhǭ (a sling; loop; noose). Cognate with Old Norse snara. Also related to German Schnur and Dutch snaar, snoer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

snare (plural snares)

Bird caught in a snare
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Drum fitted with snare wires
  1. A trap (especially one made from a loop of wire, string, or leather).
    • 1943, Graham Greene, The Ministry of Fear, London: Heinemann, 1960, Book Three, Chapter One, pp. 196-197,[1]
      He [] watched Beavis’s long-toothed mouth open and clap to like a rabbit snare.
    • 2013, Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, New York: Knopf, 2014, Chapter 18, p. 332,[2]
      He felt a snare tightening around his throat; he gasped and threw a leg out of the bed, where it jerked for a second or two, thumping the steel frame, and died.
  2. A mental or psychological trap.
  3. (veterinary) A loop of cord used in obstetric cases, to hold or to pull a fetus from the mother animal.
  4. (surgery) A similar looped instrument formerly used to remove tumours etc.
  5. (music) A set of stiff wires held under tension against the lower skin of a drum to create a rattling sound.
  6. (music) A snare drum.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

snare (third-person singular simple present snares, present participle snaring, simple past and past participle snared)

  1. (transitive) To catch or hold, especially with a loop.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To ensnare.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English sneare, snearu, from Proto-West Germanic *snarhā, from Proto-Germanic *snarhǭ.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

snare (plural snares)

  1. A trap for catching animals.
  2. A noose or snare (rope loop)
  3. (figuratively) A temptation or peril.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: snare
  • Scots: snare
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

snare

  1. Alternative form of snaren

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse snara.

Noun[edit]

snare f or m (definite singular snara or snaren, indefinite plural snarer, definite plural snarene)

  1. a snare
  2. a trap
    Synonym: felle

Verb[edit]

snare (present tense snarer, past tense snara or snaret, past participle snara or snaret)

  1. (transitive) to catch in a snare

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective[edit]

snare

  1. inflection of snar:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse snara (a snare), from Proto-Germanic *snarhǭ. Cognate with English snare.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

snare f (definite singular snara, indefinite plural snarer, definite plural snarene)

  1. a snare
  2. a trap
    Synonym: felle
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

snare (present tense snarar, past tense snara, past participle snara, passive infinitive snarast, present participle snarande, imperative snare/snar)

  1. (transitive) to catch in a snare
  2. (transitive) to ensnare

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective[edit]

snare

  1. inflection of snar:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

snare

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of snar.

Anagrams[edit]