tenus

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Esperanto[edit]

Verb[edit]

tenus

  1. conditional of teni

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

tenus

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of tenir

Anagrams[edit]


Ido[edit]

Verb[edit]

tenus

  1. conditional of tenar

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *tenos, from Proto-Indo-European *tén-os, from *ten- ‎(to stretch, draw). Compare Sanskrit तनस् ‎(tánas), Ancient Greek τένος ‎(ténos). More at teneō ‎(hold, grasp).[1]

Noun[edit]

tenus n ‎(genitive tenoris); third declension

  1. some sort of snare

Declension[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative tenus tenora
genitive tenoris tenorum
dative tenorī tenoribus
accusative tenus tenora
ablative tenore tenoribus
vocative tenus tenora

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *ten- ‎(to stretch, draw). The specific etymology is debated: De Vaan suggests that it is merely a petrified accusative of extent of the s-stem *tenos and rejects Meiser's suggestion that is stems from the Proto-Indo-European perfect participle *tn̥-wós.[1][2]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • -tenus written without a space

Postposition[edit]

tenus ‎(with genitive and dative)

  1. (with genitive and ablative) Right up to, as far as, just as far as
  2. (with ablative, of a process) Up to (a given stage of)
  3. (with genitive and ablative, of limitation) To the maximum extent of, within
  4. (Ecclesiastical Latin) Lengthwise, along

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • (perhaps) *ad tenus

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 “teneō” in Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, pages 612-613
  2. ^ Gerhard Meiser (1998) Laut-und Formenlehre der lateinischen Sprache. Darmstadt. page 183.