grin

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: grín and grîn

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) enPR: grĭn, IPA(key): /ɡɹɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Etymology 1[edit]

Before 1000 CE - From Middle English grinnen, from Old English grennian; compare to Old High German grennan (to mutter)

Noun[edit]

A stylized grin.

grin (plural grins)

  1. A smile in which the lips are parted to reveal the teeth.
    • 1997, Linda Howard, Son of the Morning, Simon & Schuster, pages 364:
      When the ceremony was finished a wide grin broke across his face, and it was that grin she saw, relieved and happy all at once.
    • 2003, Yoko Ogawa, The Housekeeper and the Professor:
      When my son appeared at the door the next day with his schoolbag on his back, the Professor broke into a wide grin and opened his arms to embrace him.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

grin (third-person singular simple present grins, present participle grinning, simple past and past participle grinned)

  1. (intransitive) To smile, parting the lips so as to show the teeth.
    Why do you grin?  Did I say something funny?
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 15, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘No,’ said Luke, grinning at her. ‘You're not dull enough! […] What about the kid's clothes? I don't suppose they were anything to write home about, but didn't you keep anything? A bootee or a bit of embroidery or anything at all?’
  2. (transitive) To express by grinning.
    She grinned pleasure at his embarrassment.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 2”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Grinned horrible a ghastly smile.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter IV, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      "Mid-Lent, and the Enemy grins," remarked Selwyn as he started for church with Nina and the children. Austin, knee-deep in a dozen Sunday supplements, refused to stir; poor little Eileen was now convalescent from grippe, but still unsteady on her legs; her maid had taken the grippe, and now moaned all day: "Mon dieu! Mon dieu! Che fais mourir!"
  3. (intransitive, dated) To show the teeth, like a snarling dog.
  4. (transitive) To grin as part of producing a particular facial expression, such as a smile or sneer.
    He grinned a broad smile when I told him the result.
    He grinned a cruel sneer when I begged him to stop.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English grin

Noun[edit]

grin (plural grins)

  1. (obsolete) A snare; a gin.
    • (Can we date this quote by Remedy of Love and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Like a bird that hasteth to his grin.

Anagrams[edit]


Bislama[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English green.

Adjective[edit]

grin

  1. green

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡriːn/, [ɡ̊ʁiːˀn]

Noun[edit]

grin n (singular definite grinet, plural indefinite grin)

  1. laugh
  2. grin
  3. fun

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

grin

  1. imperative of grine

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb grine

Noun[edit]

grin n (definite singular grinet, indefinite plural grin, definite plural grina or grinene)

  1. a grimace
  2. a sneer

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the verb grine, grina

Noun[edit]

grin n (definite singular grinet, indefinite plural grin, definite plural grina)

  1. a grimace
  2. a sneer

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

grin

  1. inflection of grina:
    1. present
    2. imperative

References[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English green.

Adjective[edit]

grin

  1. green

Vilamovian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grīn

  1. green