ring

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Ring and riñg

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English ryng, from Old English hring (ring, circle), from Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (ring), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)krengʰ-, extended nasalized form of *(s)ker- (to turn, bend).

Cognate with West Frisian ring, Low German Ring, Dutch ring, German Ring, Swedish ring, also Finnish rengas. Doublet of rank and rink.

Noun[edit]

ring (plural rings)

  1. (physical) A solid object in the shape of a circle.
    1. A circumscribing object, (roughly) circular and hollow, looking like an annual ring, earring, finger ring etc.
      Synonyms: annulus, hoop, torus
    2. A round piece of (precious) metal worn around the finger or through the ear, nose, etc.
    3. (UK) A bird band, a round piece of metal put around a bird's leg used for identification and studies of migration.
    4. (UK) A burner on a kitchen stove.
    5. In a jack plug, the connector between the tip and the sleeve.
    6. (historical) An instrument, formerly used for taking the sun's altitude, consisting of a brass ring suspended by a swivel, with a hole at one side through which a solar ray entering indicated the altitude on the graduated inner surface opposite.
    7. (botany) A flexible band partly or wholly encircling the spore cases of ferns.
  2. (physical) A group of objects arranged in a circle.
    1. A circular group of people or objects.
      a ring of mushrooms growing in the wood
    2. (astronomy) A formation of various pieces of material orbiting around a planet or young star.
    3. (British) A large circular prehistoric stone construction such as Stonehenge.
  3. A piece of food in the shape of a ring.
    onion rings
  4. (Internet) Short for webring.
    • 2002, Feroz Khan, Information Society in Global Age, page 100:
      Individuals looking to add their own homepage to a particular ring are, however, more or less at the mercy of the ringmaster, who often maintains a ring homepage listing its acceptance (or membership) policies and an index of its member sites.
  5. A place where some sports or exhibitions take place; notably a circular or comparable arena, such as a boxing ring or a circus ring; hence the field of a political contest.
    • 1707, Edmund Smith, Phaedra and Hippolitus:
      Place me, O, place me in the dusty ring, / Where youthful charioteers contend for glory.
    1. The open space in front of a racecourse stand, used for betting purposes.
  6. An exclusive group of people, usually involving some unethical or illegal practices.
    a crime ring; a prostitution ring; a bidding ring (at an auction sale)
    • 1877, Edward Augustus Freeman, The History of the Norman Conquest of England:
      the ruling ring at Constantinople
    • 1928, Upton Sinclair, Boston:
      It's a blackmail ring, and the district attorneys get a share of the loot.
    • 2018 July 31, Julia Carrie Wong, “What is QAnon? Explaining the bizarre rightwing conspiracy theory”, in The Guardian[1]:
      In a thread called “Calm Before the Storm”, and in subsequent posts, Q established his legend as a government insider with top security clearance who knew the truth about a secret struggle for power involving Donald Trump, the “deep state”, Robert Mueller, the Clintons, pedophile rings, and other stuff.
  7. (chemistry) A group of atoms linked by bonds to form a closed chain in a molecule.
    a benzene ring
  8. (geometry) A planar geometrical figure included between two concentric circles.
  9. (typography) A diacritical mark in the shape of a hollow circle placed above or under the letter; a kroužek.
  10. (historical) An old English measure of corn equal to the coomb or half a quarter.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, volume 1, page 168:
      The ring is common in the Huntingdonshire accounts of Ramsey Abbey. It was equal to half a quarter, i.e., is identical with the coomb of the eastern counties
  11. (computing theory) A hierarchical level of privilege in a computer system, usually at hardware level, used to protect data and functionality (also protection ring).
    • 2007, Steve Anson, Steve Bunting, Mastering Windows Network Forensics and Investigation, page 70:
      Kernel Mode processes run in ring 0, and User Mode processes run in ring 3.
  12. (firearms) Either of the pair of clamps used to hold a telescopic sight to a rifle.
  13. (cartomancy) The twenty-fifth Lenormand card.
  14. (networking) A network topology where connected devices form a circular data channel. All computers on the ring can see every message, and there are no collisions, and a single point of failure will occur if any part of the ring breaks.
Derived terms[edit]
Terms derived from "ring" (etymology 1)
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
Gallery[edit]

Verb[edit]

ring (third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past and past participle ringed)

  1. (transitive) To enclose or surround.
    The inner city was ringed with dingy industrial areas.
    • 2022 January 12, Paul Bigland, “Fab Four: the nation's finest stations: Eastbourne”, in RAIL, number 948, page 27:
      Today, when stepping off the train, you're presented with a bright and airy concourse that's ringed with a variety of facilities.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To make an incision around; to girdle; to cut away a circular tract of bark from a tree in order to kill it.
    They ringed the trees to make the clearing easier next year.
    • 1887, Harriet W. Daly, Digging, Squatting, and Pioneering Life in the Northern Territory of South Australia, page 50:
      The ironbark trees are "rung" at a certain height top and bottom, and the bark detached in one sheet; it is then wetted, and laid out flat on the ground, huge stones being placed to keep it from rolling up again.
  3. (transitive) To attach a ring to, especially for identification.
    We managed to ring 22 birds this morning.
    • 1919, Popular Science, volume 95, number 4, page 31:
      Ringing a pig of ordinary size is easy, but special arrangements must be made for handling the big ones.
  4. (transitive) To surround or fit with a ring, or as if with a ring.
    to ring a pig’s snout
  5. (falconry) To rise in the air spirally.
  6. (transitive) To steal and change the identity of (cars) in order to resell them.
    • A. Woodley, Trio: 3 short stories
      Gabe said that as Derry had only caught part of the conversation, it's possible that they were discussing a film, it was bad enough that they'd unwittingly been brought into ringing cars, adding drugs into it was far more than either of them could ever be comfortable with.
    • 2019 (10 December), Ross McCarthy, Digbeth chop shop gang jailed over £2m stolen car racket (in Birmingham Live) [2]
      They used two bases in Digbeth to break down luxury motors, some of which were carjacked or stolen after keys were taken in house raids. The parts were then fitted to salvaged cars bought online. [] Jailing the quartet, a judge at Birmingham Crown Court said it was a "car ringing on a commercial and substantial scale".
  7. (Australia, transitive) To ride around (a group of animals, especially catle) to keep them milling in one place; hence (intransitive), to work as a drover, to muster cattle.
    • 2002, Alex Miller, Journey to the Stone Country, Allen & Unwin, published 2003, page 289:
      ‘I was ringing for your dad out there at Haddon Hill the year you was born. It was a good year for calves.’
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ringen, from Old English hrinġan (to ring), from Proto-Germanic *hringijaną. Cognate with Dutch ringen, Swedish ringa. Of imitative origin.

Noun[edit]

ring (plural rings)

  1. The resonant sound of a bell, or a sound resembling it.
    The church bell's ring could be heard the length of the valley.
    The ring of hammer on anvil filled the air.
  2. (figuratively) A pleasant or correct sound.
    The name has a nice ring to it.
  3. (figuratively) A sound or appearance that is characteristic of something.
    Her statements in court had a ring of falsehood.
  4. (colloquial) A telephone call.
    I’ll give you a ring when the plane lands.
  5. Any loud sound; the sound of numerous voices; a sound continued, repeated, or reverberated.
  6. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.
    St Mary's has a ring of eight bells.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church-history of Britain; [], London: [] Iohn Williams [], →OCLC:
      as great and tunable a ring of bells as any in the world
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

ring (third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past rang or (nonstandard) rung, past participle rung)

  1. (intransitive) Of a bell, etc., to produce a resonant sound.
    The bells were ringing in the town.
  2. (transitive) To make (a bell, etc.) produce a resonant sound.
    The deliveryman rang the doorbell to drop off a parcel.
  3. (transitive) To produce (a sound) by ringing.
    They rang a Christmas carol on their handbells.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To produce the sound of a bell or a similar sound.
    Whose mobile phone is ringing?
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) Of something spoken or written, to appear to be, to seem, to sound.
    That does not ring true.
  6. (transitive, colloquial, British, Australia, New Zealand) To telephone (someone).
    I will ring you when we arrive.
  7. (intransitive) to resound, reverberate, echo.
    • 1850, [Alfred, Lord Tennyson], In Memoriam, London: Edward Moxon, [], →OCLC, Canto XXIII, page 40:
      [] And many an old philosophy
      ⁠On Argive heights divinely sang,
      ⁠And round us all the thicket rang
      To many a flute of Arcady.
    • Lua error in Module:quote at line 2930: Parameter "chapter" is not used by this template.
    • 1919, Boris Sidis, The Source and Aim of Human Progress:
      It is instructive for us to learn as well as to ponder on the fact that "the very men who looked down with delight, when the sand of the arena reddened with human blood, made the arena ring with applause when Terence in his famous line: ‘Homo sum, Nihil humani alienum puto’ proclaimed the brotherhood of man."
  8. (intransitive) To produce music with bells.
    • 1669, William Holder, Elements of Speech: An Essay of Inquiry into the Natural Production of Letters: [], London: [] T. N[ewcomb] for J[ohn] Martyn printer to the R[oyal] Society, [], →OCLC:
      Four Bells admit Twenty-four changes in Ringing
  9. To ring up (enter into a cash register or till)
    • 1983, T.C. Knudsen, John Hempstead, A Man's Guide to Women:
      The checkout girl rang it into his total, and he paid the bill.
    • 1990, The New Zealand Law Reports - Volume 3, page 75:
      On presentation of the item at the checkout the original price sticker was concealed from the checkout assistant and a sticker of $38.88 exhibited on the item. The checkout operator rang on the lesser sum, a mistake known to Dronjak. He was subsequently charged with theft.
    • 2011, Tracy E Whipple, A Friend's Last Gift, page 88:
      . The new cashier rang something twice and had to call for the manager to fix the register.
  10. (dated) To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.
Derived terms[edit]
Terms derived from ring (verb, etymology 2)
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

From a shortening of German Zahlring (number(s) ring) (coined by German mathematician David Hilbert in 1892).[1] Apparently first used in English in 1930, E. T. Bell, “Rings whose elements are ideals,” Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society.[2]

The symbol represents the ring of integers.

Noun[edit]

ring (plural rings)

  1. (algebra) An algebraic structure which consists of a set with two binary operations: an additive operation and a multiplicative operation, such that the set is an abelian group under the additive operation, a monoid under the multiplicative operation, and such that the multiplicative operation is distributive with respect to the additive operation.
    The set of integers, , is the prototypical ring.
  2. (algebra) An algebraic structure as above, but only required to be a semigroup under the multiplicative operation, that is, there need not be a multiplicative identity element.
    The definition of ring without unity allows, for instance, the set of even integers to be a ring.
    Synonym: rng
Hypernyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Meronyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

ring (plural rings)

  1. (mathematical analysis, measure theory) A family of sets that is closed under finite unions and set-theoretic differences.[3]
  2. (mathematics, order theory) A family of sets closed under finite union and finite intersection.
Hyponyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1962, Harvey Cohn, A Second Course in Number Theory, Wiley, 1980, Advanced Number Theory, Dover, Unabridged republication, page 49.
  2. ^ Earliest Known Uses of Some of the Words of Mathematics (R)
  3. ^ Gerald B. Folland (©1999) Real Analysis : Modern Techniques and Their Applications, Second edition, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., →ISBN, →OCLC, §1.2, page 24

Anagrams[edit]

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch ring, from Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring (plural ringe)

  1. ring, hollow circular object

Atong (India)[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.).

Noun[edit]

ring

  1. taro

References[edit]

Balinese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ring

  1. Romanization of ᬭᬶᬂ

Cimbrian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ring

  1. (of weight) light

References[edit]

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring m inan

  1. ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ring in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ring in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring c (singular definite ringen, plural indefinite ringe)

  1. ring
  2. circle
  3. halo
  4. hoop
  5. coil
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verbal noun to ringe (to ring).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring n (singular definite ringet, plural indefinite ring)

  1. (archaic) ring (the resonant sound of a bell, a telephone call)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See ringe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ring

  1. imperative of ringe

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring m (plural ringen, diminutive ringetje n)

  1. ring, hollow circular object
  2. (gymnastics) ring
  3. beltway, ring road

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German rink. Compare German Ring. See also rõngas.

Noun[edit]

ring (genitive ringi, partitive ringi)

  1. circle

Declension[edit]

Declension of ring (ÕS type 22e/riik, length gradation)
singular plural
nominative ring ringid
accusative nom.
gen. ringi
genitive ringide
partitive ringi ringe
ringisid
illative ringi
ringisse
ringidesse
ringesse
inessive ringis ringides
ringes
elative ringist ringidest
ringest
allative ringile ringidele
ringele
adessive ringil ringidel
ringel
ablative ringilt ringidelt
ringelt
translative ringiks ringideks
ringeks
terminative ringini ringideni
essive ringina ringidena
abessive ringita ringideta
comitative ringiga ringidega

See also[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ring (sense 1) and Dutch ring (sense 2).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring m (plural rings)

  1. (sports, chiefly combat sports) ring
  2. (Belgium) ring road, beltway

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Garo[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring

  1. boat

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ring

  1. singular imperative of ringen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of ringen

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From an onomatopoeic (sound-imitative) root + -g (frequentative suffix).[1]

Verb[edit]

ring

  1. (intransitive) to swing, to rock
    Synonyms: billeg, inog, ingadozik, himbálózik, himbálódzik
  2. (intransitive, of a ship) to sway, to roll
    Synonyms: ringatózik, ringatódzik, dülöng, dülöngél, himbálódzik, himbálózik
Conjugation[edit]

or

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English ring.[2]

Noun[edit]

ring (plural ringek)

  1. (dated, boxing) ring, boxing ring (space in which a boxing match is contested)
    Synonym: szorító
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative ring ringek
accusative ringet ringeket
dative ringnek ringeknek
instrumental ringgel ringekkel
causal-final ringért ringekért
translative ringgé ringekké
terminative ringig ringekig
essive-formal ringként ringekként
essive-modal
inessive ringben ringekben
superessive ringen ringeken
adessive ringnél ringeknél
illative ringbe ringekbe
sublative ringre ringekre
allative ringhez ringekhez
elative ringből ringekből
delative ringről ringekről
ablative ringtől ringektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
ringé ringeké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
ringéi ringekéi
Possessive forms of ring
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. ringem ringjeim
2nd person sing. ringed ringjeid
3rd person sing. ringje ringjei
1st person plural ringünk ringjeink
2nd person plural ringetek ringjeitek
3rd person plural ringjük ringjeik

References[edit]

  1. ^ ring in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)
  2. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Further reading[edit]

  • (to roll, sway, swing): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (boxing ring): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (in economy, cf. cartel): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology 1[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɪŋ]
  • Hyphenation: ring

Noun[edit]

ring (first-person possessive ringku, second-person possessive ringmu, third-person possessive ringnya)

  1. (onomatopoeia) sound of bell.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch ring, from Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz. Doublet of langsir.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɪŋ]
  • Hyphenation: ring

Noun[edit]

ring

  1. ring,
    1. a circumscribing object, (roughly) circular and hollow, looking like an annual ring, earring, finger ring etc.
      Synonyms: cincin, gelang
    2. boxing ring.
  2. (colloquial) circle
    Synonym: lingkaran

Further reading[edit]

Mizo[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ring

  1. loud

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun[edit]

ring m (definite singular ringen, indefinite plural ringer, definite plural ringene)

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

ring

  1. imperative of ringe

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring m (definite singular ringen, indefinite plural ringar, definite plural ringane)

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. a circle
  3. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ring

  1. imperative of ringja and ringa

References[edit]

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun[edit]

ring m

  1. ring, circle

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • rink”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hring.

Noun[edit]

ring m

  1. ring (object in the shape of a circle)

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English ring. Doublet of ranga and rynek.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring m inan (related adjective ringowy)

  1. (boxing) boxing ring

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ring in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ring in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English ring.

Noun[edit]

ring m (plural rings)

  1. Alternative form of ringue

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ring.

Noun[edit]

rȉng m (Cyrillic spelling ри̏нг)

  1. the ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

Declension[edit]

This entry needs an inflection-table template.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English ring. Doublet of rancho.

Noun[edit]

ring m (plural rings)

  1. (boxing) ring

Further reading[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish ringer, from Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun[edit]

ring c

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
  3. (mathematics) A ring, algebraic structure
  4. (mathematics) A ring, planar geometrical figure
  5. (astronomy) A ring, collection of material orbiting some planets
  6. Each of the (usually three) years in a Swedish gymnasium (highschool)
    Ann började nyss andra ring.
    Ann recently began her second year at the gymnasium.
Declension[edit]
Declension of ring 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ring ringen ringar ringarna
Genitive rings ringens ringars ringarnas
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

ring

  1. imperative of ringa

References[edit]

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian hring, from Proto-West Germanic *hring. Cognate with English ring, Dutch ring, Saterland Frisian Ring.

Noun[edit]

ring c (plural ringen, diminutive rinkje)

  1. ring, circle
  2. ring (jewelry)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ring”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ryng, from Old English hring, from Proto-West Germanic *hring.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ring

  1. ring
    • 1867, “THE WEDDEEN O BALLYMORE”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 5, page 96:
      A peepeare struck ap; wough dansth aul in a ring;
      The piper struck up, we danced all in a ring,

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 96