car

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English carre, borrowed from Anglo-Norman carre, from Old Northern French (compare Old French char), from Latin carra, neuter plural of carrus (four-wheeled baggage wagon), from Gaulish *karros, from Proto-Celtic *karros (wagon).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

car (plural cars)

  1. A wheeled vehicle that moves independently, with at least three wheels, powered mechanically, steered by a driver and mostly for personal transportation.
    Synonyms: auto, motorcar, vehicle, (US) automobile, (Britain, colloquial) motor, (obsolete) carriage; see also Thesaurus:automobile
    She drove her car to the mall.
    • 2005, Jordan Houston, Darnell Carlton, Paul Beauregard, Premro Smith, Marlon Goodwin, David Brown, and Willie Hutchinson (lyrics), “Stay Fly”, in Most Known Unknown[1], Sony BMG, performed by Three 6 Mafia (featuring Young Buck, 8 Ball, and MJG):
      I'm a stunt; ride in the car with some bump in the trunk.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 1, in Internal Combustion[2]:
      If successful, Edison and Ford—in 1914—would move society away from the ever more expensive and then universally known killing hazards of gasoline cars: […] .
  2. (dated) A wheeled vehicle, drawn by a horse or other animal; a chariot.
    • 1594, Christopher Marlowe, Edward II, London: William Jones,[3]
      It shall suffice me to enioy your loue,
      Which whiles I haue, I thinke my selfe as great,
      As Caesar riding in the Romaine streete,
      With captiue kings at his triumphant Carre.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act IV, Scene 8,[4]
      He has deserved it [armour], were it carbuncled
      Like holy Phoebus’ car.
    1. (Britain, Birmingham, obsolete) A four-wheeled cab, as opposed to a (two-wheeled) Hansom cab.
  3. (rail transport, chiefly Canada, US) An unpowered unit in a railroad train.
    Synonyms: railcar, wagon
    The conductor coupled the cars to the locomotive.
  4. (rail transport) an individual vehicle, powered or unpowered, in a multiple unit.
    The 11:10 to London was operated by a 4-car diesel multiple unit.
  5. (rail transport) A passenger-carrying unit in a subway or elevated train, whether powered or not.
    From the frontmost car of the subway, he filmed the progress through the tunnel.
  6. A rough unit of quantity approximating the amount which would fill a railroad car.
    Synonyms: carload, wagonload
    We ordered five hundred cars of gypsum.
  7. The moving, load-carrying component of an elevator or other cable-drawn transport mechanism.
    Fix the car of the express elevator - the door is sticking.
  8. The passenger-carrying portion of certain amusement park rides, such as Ferris wheels.
    Synonym: carriage
    The most exciting part of riding a Ferris wheel is when your car goes over the top.
  9. The part of an airship, such as a balloon or dirigible, which houses the passengers and control apparatus.
    Synonyms: gondola, (balloons only) basket
    • 1850, John Wise, A System of Aeronautics, page 152:
      Everything being apparently in readiness now, I stepped into the car of the balloon, []
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[5]:
      "What about a car?" "The car will be my next care. I have already planned how it is to be made and attached. Meanwhile I will simply show you how capable my apparatus is of supporting the weight of each of us."
  10. (sailing) A sliding fitting that runs along a track.
    • 1995, Ken Textor, The New Book of Sail Trim[6], →ISBN, page 201:
      On boats 25 feet or more, it is best to mount a mast car and track on the front of the mast so you can adjust the height of the pole above the deck
  11. (uncountable, US, slang) The aggregate of desirable characteristics of a car.
    Buy now! You can get more car for your money.
  12. (US) A floating perforated box for living fish.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Etymology unclear, but probably from Proto-Germanic *karzijaną (to turn), from Proto-Indo-European *gers- (to bend, turn). Compare cair (to turn, go), char (to turn), Dutch keren (to turn), German Kehre (turn, bend).

Shakespeare had something of a fondness for verbalizing nouns, and sometimes even substantivizing verbs. However, anything other than a "turn" does not seem to make any sense within the broader context of the cited Sonnet.

Noun[edit]

car (plural cars)

  1. (obsolete) A turn.
    • 1609 William Shakespeare, Sonnet 7,[7]
      But when from highmost pitch, with weary car,
      Like feeble age, he reeleth from the day, (after the sun reaches the zenith it, with a weary turn, begins to reel (to roll) (downwards))

Etymology 3[edit]

Diagram for the list (42 69 613). The car of the first cons is 42, and the cdr points the next cons.

Acronym of contents of the address part of register number. Note that it was based on original hardware and has no meaning today.

Noun[edit]

car (plural cars)

  1. (programming) The first part of a cons in LISP. The first element of a list.
    Antonym: cdr
    Holonym: cons
    • 2000, Matt Kaufmann; Panagiotis Manolios; J Strother Moore, Computer-aided reasoning: an approach:
      The elements of a list are the successive cars along the "cdr chain." That is, the elements are the car, the car of the cdr, the car of the cdr of the cdr, etc.
Derived terms[edit]

Gallery[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin carrus, from Gaulish karros. Compare Romanian car.

Noun[edit]

car n (plural cari)

  1. chariot
  2. ox-cart

Related terms[edit]


Aynu[edit]

Noun[edit]

car

  1. mouth

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cārus.

Adjective[edit]

car (feminine cara, masculine plural cars, feminine plural cares)

  1. expensive
    Synonyms: alt, costós
    Antonym: barat
  2. (poetic) dear
    Synonyms: estimat, amat, apreciat

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin quārē (how; why). Compare French car.

Conjunction[edit]

car

  1. as, since, because, for
    Synonym: perquè

Further reading[edit]

  • “car” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

car m

  1. tsar

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • car in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • car in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French quer (as, since, because, for), from Latin quārē (how; why). Compare Catalan car.

Conjunction[edit]

car

  1. as, since, because, for
    • c. 1656–1662, Blaise Pascal, “Dossier de travail - Fragment n° 10 / 35”, in Pensées [Thoughts]‎[8]:
      Car dans la création de l’homme Adam en était le témoin et le dépositaire de la promesse du sauveur qui devait naître de la femme, lorsque les hommes étaient encore si proches de la Création qu’ils ne pouvaient avoir oublié leur création et leur chute.
      For in the creation of man, Adam was the witness and the depositary of the promise of the saviour who would be born of woman, when the men were still so close to the Creation that they could not have forgotten their creation and their fall.
    J’ai ouvert mon parapluie car il pleuvait.
    I opened my umbrella because it was raining.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English car, itself borrowed from Anglo-Norman and the Old Northern French car, variant of Old French char. Doublet of char.

Noun[edit]

car m (plural cars)

  1. a single-decked long-distance, or privately hired, bus, a coach
    Les élèves vont à l’école en car.The pupils go to school by coach.
Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

car (comparative plus car, superlative le plus car)

  1. dear; beloved; cherished
  2. expensive

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish caraid, from Proto-Celtic *kareti (to love), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂- (to desire, wish).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

car (present analytic carann, future analytic carfaidh, verbal noun carthain, past participle cartha)

  1. to love
  2. be devoted to

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
car char gcar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Synonyms[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

car

  1. for (because)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: car

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Italian caro, from Latin carus.

Adjective[edit]

car

  1. dear

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin cārus.

Adjective[edit]

car m (feminine singular cara, masculine plural cars, feminine plural caras)

  1. dear
  2. expensive

Piedmontese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

car

  1. dear

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Russian царь (carʹ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar. Doublet of cesarz (emperor).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

car m pers

  1. czar, tsar, tzar (title of the former emperors of Russia)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • car in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin carrus, from Gaulish karros.

Noun[edit]

car n (plural care)

  1. cart
  2. chariot
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

car

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of căra

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin caries or carius. Doublet of carie.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

car m (plural cari)

  1. death-watch beetle
Declension[edit]

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cor (act of putting), verbal noun of fo·ceird (to put).

Noun[edit]

car m (genitive singular cuir, plural caran)

  1. job
  2. twist, turn
  3. trick
  4. bit

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

car

  1. somewhat, quite, rather
    Tha thu car fadalach.You're somewhat late.
    Thig an stòiridh gu ceann car obann.The story came to an end somewhat abruptly.

Related terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, *cьsarь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cȁr m (Cyrillic spelling ца̏р)

  1. czar, emperor, monarch
    Podajte caru carevo, a Bogu Božje.Give the Emperor what belongs to the Emperor and God what belongs to God.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Serbo-Croatian cȁr, from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /t͡sàːr/, /t͡sáːr/

Noun[edit]

cār m anim (female equivalent caríca or cārinja)

  1. tsar

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., soft o-stem
nom. sing. cár
gen. sing. cárja
singular dual plural
nominative cár cárja cárji
accusative cár cárja cárje
genitive cárja cárjev cárjev
dative cárju cárjema cárjem
locative cárju cárjih cárjih
instrumental cárjem cárjema cárji

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • car”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quārē (why).

Adverb[edit]

car

  1. (archaic) because
    Synonym: porque

Further reading[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

car (nominative plural cars)

  1. (weapon) bow

Declension[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh carr, from Proto-Brythonic *karr, from Proto-Celtic *karros.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

car m (plural ceir)

  1. car

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
car gar nghar char
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.