carom

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably corrupted from French carambole (the red ball in billiards).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carom (countable and uncountable, plural caroms)

  1. (countable, cue sports, especially billiards) A shot in which the ball struck with the cue comes in contact with two or more balls on the table; a hitting of two or more balls with the player's ball.
  2. (uncountable) A billiard-like Indian game in which players take turns flicking checker-like pieces into one of four goals on the corners of a board measuring one meter by one meter.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (shot in which the cue ball strikes two balls): cannon (UK)
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

carom (third-person singular simple present caroms, present participle caroming, simple past and past participle caromed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a carom (shot in billiards).
  2. To strike and bounce back; to strike (something) and rebound.
    • 2012, John Branch, “Snow Fall : The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek”, in New York Time[1]:
      Snow filled her mouth. She caromed off things she never saw, tumbling through a cluttered canyon like a steel marble falling through pins in a pachinko machine.
    • 1922, John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World:
      [T]he grubit bombs went rolling back and forth over our feet, fetching up against the sides of the car with a crash. The big Red Guard, whose name was Vladimir Nicolaievitch, plied me with questions about America [] while we held on to each other and danced amid the caroming bombs.
References[edit]

carom in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

carom (uncountable)

  1. (spices) ajwain

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carom m

  1. dative plural of car

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

carom

  1. (literary) first-person plural present subjunctive of caru

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
carom garom ngharom charom
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.