truckle

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English trokel, trocle, trookyl, from Anglo-Norman trocle, from Medieval Latin trochlea (a block, sheaf containing one or more pulleys); or from a diminutive of truck (wheel), formed with -le, equivalent to truck +‎ -le.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

truckle (plural truckles)

  1. A small wheel; a caster or pulley.
  2. A small wheel of cheese.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

truckle (third-person singular simple present truckles, present participle truckling, simple past and past participle truckled)

  1. To roll or move upon truckles, or casters; to trundle.

Etymology 2[edit]

From a back formation of truckle bed (a bed on which a pupil slept, because it was rolled on casters into a lower position under the master's larger bed), from Middle English trookylbed. Compare also trundle bed. Assisted by false association with Middle English *trukelen, truken, trokien, trukien, from Old English trucian (to fail, diminish), Low German truggeln (to flatter, fawn), see truck.

Verb[edit]

truckle (third-person singular simple present truckles, present participle truckling, simple past and past participle truckled)

  1. (intransitive) To act in a submissive manner; to fawn, submit to a superior.
    • 1869, Louisa May Alcott, Little Women:
      "Why in the world should you spend your money, worry your family, and turn the house upside down for a parcel of girls who don't care a sixpence for you? I thought you had too much pride and sense to truckle to any mortal woman just because she wears French boots and rides in a coupe," said Jo, who, being called from the tragic climax of her novel, was not in the best mood for social enterprises. "I don't truckle, and I hate being patronized as much as you do!" returned Amy indignantly, for the two still jangled when such questions arose.
    • 1899, William Graham Sumner, “The Conquest of the United States by Spain”, in War and Other Essays, Yale, published 1911, page 302:
      There is no doubt [] that truckling to popularity is the worst political vice.
    • Norris
      Religion itself is forced to truckle to worldly policy.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967