care

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See also: carè, caré, and çare

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English care, from Old English caru, ċearu ‎(care, concern, anxiety, sorrow, grief, trouble), from Proto-Germanic *karō ‎(care, sorrow, cry), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵeh₂r- ‎(shout, call). Cognate with Old Saxon cara, kara ‎(concern, action), Middle High German kar ‎(sorrow, lamentation), Icelandic kör ‎(sickbed), Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐍂𐌰 ‎(kara, concern, care). Related also to Dutch karig ‎(scanty), German karg ‎(sparse, meagre, barren). See chary.

Noun[edit]

care ‎(countable and uncountable, plural cares)

  1. (obsolete) Grief, sorrow.
  2. Close attention; concern; responsibility.
    Care should be taken when holding babies.
    • Shakespeare
      I thank thee for thy care and honest pains.
  3. Worry.
    I don't have a care in the world.
  4. Maintenance, upkeep.
    dental care
  5. The treatment of those in need (especially as a profession).
  6. The state of being cared for by others.
    in care
  7. The object of watchful attention or anxiety.
    • Spenser
      Right sorrowfully mourning her bereaved cares.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Quotations[edit]
  • 1925, Walter Anthony and Tom Reed (titles), Rupert Julian (director), The Phantom of the Opera, silent movie
    ‘Have a care, Buquet—ghosts like not to be seen or talked about!’

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English caren, carien, from Old English carian ‎(to sorrow, grieve, be troubled, be anxious, to care for, heed), from Proto-Germanic *karōną ‎(to care), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵār-, *gÀr- ‎(voice, exclamation). Cognate with Middle High German karn ‎(to complain, lament, grieve, mourn), Alemannic German karen, kären ‎(to groan, wheeze, give a death rattle), Swedish kära ‎(to fall in love), Icelandic kæra ‎(to care, like), Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐍂𐍉𐌽 ‎(karōn, to be concerned).

Verb[edit]

care ‎(third-person singular simple present cares, present participle caring, simple past and past participle cared)

  1. (intransitive) To be concerned about, have an interest in.
    I don't care what you think.
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, The Unknown Ajax:
      And no use for anyone to tell Charles that this was because the Family was in mourning for Mr Granville Darracott […]: Charles might only have been second footman at Darracott Place for a couple of months when that disaster occurred, but no one could gammon him into thinking that my lord cared a spangle for his heir.
    • 2012 May 27, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992)”, The Onion AV Club:
      This newfound infatuation renders Bart uncharacteristically vulnerable. He suddenly has something to care about beyond causing trouble and makes a dramatic transformation from hell-raiser to gentleman about town.
  2. (intransitive) To look after.
    Young children can learn to care for a pet.
  3. (intransitive) To be mindful of.
  4. Polite or formal way to say want.
    Would you care for another slice of cake?
    Would you care to dance?
Usage notes[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

care

  1. first-person singular present indicative of carer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of carer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of carer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of carer
  5. second-person singular imperative of carer

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

care f pl

  1. feminine plural of caro

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

carē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of careō

Adjective[edit]

cāre

  1. vocative masculine singular of cārus

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin qualis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

care

  1. which
    Care din aceste jocuri este nou? - Which of these games is new?

Inflection[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

care

  1. which, that, who
    El este un om care a văzut foarte multe lucruri. - He is a man who has seen very many things.

Venetian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

care f

  1. feminine plural of caro