cera

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See also: Cera, ceră, and c'era

Asturian[edit]

Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ast

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cēra.

Noun[edit]

cera f (plural ceres)

  1. wax

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cēra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cera f (plural ceres)

  1. wax

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese cera, from Latin cēra.

Noun[edit]

cera f (plural ceras)

  1. wax

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cēra (wax).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃe.ra/
  • Rhymes: -era
  • Hyphenation: cé‧ra

Noun[edit]

cera f (plural cere)

  1. wax
  2. complexion

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A foreign loan from a substrate language, cognate with Ancient Greek κηρός (kērós) and Albanian qiri,[1] and possibly also with Lithuanian korys and Latvian kāre.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cēra f (genitive cērae); first declension

  1. wax, beeswax, honeycomb
  2. a writing tablet covered with wax, wax tablet
  3. a wax seal
  4. a wax image
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cēra cērae
Genitive cērae cērārum
Dative cērae cērīs
Accusative cēram cērās
Ablative cērā cērīs
Vocative cēra cērae
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cērā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cērō

References[edit]

  • cera in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cera in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cera in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cera in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • cera in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cera in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ Mallory, Douglas, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture
  2. ^ Chantraine, Pierre (1968–1980), “κηρός”, in Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque (in French), Paris: Klincksieck, pages 526–527

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cēra.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

cera f (plural ceras)

  1. wax

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From cyra, from German Zier, from Middle High German ziere, from Old High German ziari.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cera f

  1. complexion

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • cera in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • cera in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese cera (wax), from Latin cēra.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈse.ɾɐ/, [ˈse.ɾɐ]

  • Hyphenation: ce‧ra
  • Rhymes: -eɾɐ

Noun[edit]

cera f (plural ceras)

  1. wax (oily, water-resistant substance)
  2. earwax, cerumen

Related terms[edit]


Silesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Czech cera, from Proto-Slavic *dъ̏ťi, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *duktḗ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰugh₂tḗr.

Noun[edit]

cera f

  1. daughter

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cēra (wax).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈθeɾa/, [ˈθe.ɾa]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈseɾa/, [ˈse.ɾa]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɾa

Noun[edit]

cera f (plural ceras)

  1. wax
  2. (Spain) crayon
    Synonyms: (Colombia, Venezuela, Canary Islands) creyón, (Argentina, Guatemala, Honduras, Uruguay) crayón, (Cuba, Mexico, Peru) crayola, (Spain) lápiz de cera

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]