carus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek κάρος (káros, deep sleep) .

Noun[edit]

carus

  1. (medicine) coma with complete insensibility; deep lethargy

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for carus in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *kāros, from Proto-Indo-European *kéh₂ros, from *keh₂- (to desire, to wish).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cārus (feminine cāra, neuter cārum); first/second declension

  1. dear, beloved
  2. expensive

Inflection[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative cārus cāra cārum cārī cārae cāra
genitive cārī cārae cārī cārōrum cārārum cārōrum
dative cārō cārō cārīs
accusative cārum cāram cārum cārōs cārās cāra
ablative cārō cārā cārō cārīs
vocative cāre cāra cārum cārī cārae cāra

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • carus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • carus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • carus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to feel affection for a person: carum habere aliquem
    • to be dear to some one: carum esse alicui
    • to be dear to some one: carum atque iucundum esse alicui
    • (ambiguous) corn is dear: annona cara est
  • carus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • carus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Latvian[edit]

Noun[edit]

carus m

  1. accusative plural form of cars