czar

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Czar

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /zɑː(ɹ)/, /tsɑː(ɹ)/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

czar (plural czars)

  1. Alternative spelling of tsar (especially common in American English)
  2. (informal, politics, US) An appointed official tasked to regulate or oversee a specific area.
    • 2020 May 8, Jayne O'Donnell, “'Deaths of despair': Coronavirus pandemic could push suicide, drug deaths as high as 150k, study says”, in USA Today[1], archived from the original on 9 May 2020:
      The federal mental health czar is calling for more money to expand services to help people suffering amid the social isolation imposed by the coronavirus pandemic...
    drug czar

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

"À sa Majesté Alexandre III Czar de toutes les Russies", Marche Russe by Louis Ganne

Noun[edit]

czar m (plural czars)

  1. Alternative spelling of tsar (old)

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *čarъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *ker- *kēr-, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷer-.

Noun[edit]

czar m inan

  1. spell (magic)
    Synonyms: zaklęcie, urok
  2. allure, charm (quality of inspiring delight or admiration)
    Synonym: urok
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun[edit]

czar

  1. genitive plural of czara

Further reading[edit]

  • czar in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • czar in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

czar

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

czar m (plural czares, feminine czarina, feminine plural czarinas)

  1. tsar