charm

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See also: Charm

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English charme, from Old French charme (chant, magic spell), from Latin carmen (song, incantation).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

charm (countable and uncountable, plural charms)

  1. An object, act or words believed to have magic power (usually carries a positive connotation).
    Synonyms: incantation, spell, talisman
    a charm against evil
    It works like a charm.
  2. (often in the plural) The ability to persuade, delight or arouse admiration.
    Synonyms: appeal, attraction, charisma
    Antonyms: boredom, dryness
    He had great personal charm.
    She tried to win him over with her charms.
  3. A small trinket on a bracelet or chain, etc., traditionally supposed to confer luck upon the wearer.
    Synonyms: amulet, dangle, ornament
    She wears a charm bracelet on her wrist.
  4. (particle physics) A quantum number of hadrons determined by the number of charm quarks and antiquarks.
    Coordinate term: strangeness
    • 1975 July 31, Sandra Blakeslee, “Another Particle Believed Discovered”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      In trying to understand the long life of the psi particle, physicists postulated the notion of “charm.” Charm, they say, prevents the “easy” decay of particles and thus prolongs their lifetimes. U particles, Dr. Pert said, may carry the property of charm.
    • 2020, James E. Dodd; Ben Gripaios, The Ideas of Particle Physics, Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 173:
      Mesons which combine the charmed quark with the up or down antiquarks are denoted the D mesons. These mesons carry explicit charm (i.e. have a non-zero charm quantum number), just as the K mesons carry strangeness.
  5. (finance) A second-order measure of derivative price sensitivity, expressed as the instantaneous rate of change of delta with respect to time.
    Synonyms: delta decay, DdeltaDtime
    Hypernym: Greeks
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

charm (third-person singular simple present charms, present participle charming, simple past and past participle charmed)

  1. To seduce, persuade or fascinate someone or something.
    Synonyms: delight, enchant, entrance
    He charmed her with his dashing tales of his days as a sailor.
  2. (transitive) To use a magical charm upon; to subdue, control, or summon by incantation or supernatural influence.
    Synonyms: bewitch, enchant, ensorcel, enspell
    After winning three games while wearing the chain, Dan began to think it had been charmed.
  3. To protect with, or make invulnerable by, spells, charms, or supernatural influences.
    She led a charmed life.
  4. (obsolete, rare) To make music upon.
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], “October. Aegloga Decima.”, in The Shepheardes Calender: [], London: [] Hugh Singleton, [], OCLC 606515406; reprinted as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, The Shepheardes Calender [], London: John C. Nimmo, [], 1890, OCLC 890162479, folio 42, recto:
      But ah my corage cooles ere it be warme, / For thy, content vs in thys humble ſhade: / Where no ſuch troublous tydes han vs aſſayde, / Here we our ſlender pipes may ſafely charme.
  5. To subdue or overcome by some secret power, or by that which gives pleasure; to allay; to soothe.
    • 1708, Alexander Pope, Ode for Music on St Cecilia's Day:
      Music the fiercest grief can charm.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of chirm, from Middle English chirme, from Old English ċierm (cry, alarm), from Proto-Germanic *karmiz.

Noun[edit]

charm (plural charms)

  1. The mixed sound of many voices, especially of birds or children.
  2. A flock, group (especially of finches).
    • 2018, Holly Ringland, The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart:
      A charm of finches flew overhead, singing into the vivid afternoon sky.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English charm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

charm c (singular definite charmen, plural indefinite charms)

  1. charm (jewelry)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See charme (to charm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

charm

  1. imperative of charme

Palauan[edit]

Noun[edit]

charm

  1. animal

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

charm c

  1. charm; the ability to persuade, delight, or arouse admiration

Declension[edit]

Declension of charm 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative charm charmen
Genitive charms charmens

Related terms[edit]