charme

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See also: Charme and charmé

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

charme (countable and uncountable, plural charmes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of charm

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French charme, from Latin carmen (song), from Proto-Indo-European *kan- (to sing).

Noun[edit]

charme c (singular definite charmen, plural indefinite charmer)

  1. charm (quality of inspiring delight or admiration)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Derived from the noun, probably after English charm.

Verb[edit]

charme (imperative charm, infinitive at charme, present tense charmer, past tense charmede, perfect tense har charmet)

  1. to charm (seduce, entrance or fascinate)
Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French charme (charm), from Middle French charme (spell; charm), from Old French charme (spell), from Latin carmen (song; incantation).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃɑr.mə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: char‧me
  • Rhymes: -ɑrmə

Noun[edit]

charme m (plural charmes)

  1. charm (quality of inspiring delight or admiration)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French charme (chant, magic spell), from Latin carmen, carminis (song, recitement, incantation).

Noun[edit]

charme m (plural charmes)

  1. charm, attractive quality
  2. enchantment; originally, magical incantation
  3. glamour (alluring beauty or charm, often with sex appeal)
    mannequin de charme; photos de charme

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

charme

  1. inflection of charmer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French, from Latin carpinus, probably from Proto-Indo-European *kar- (hard).

Noun[edit]

charme m (plural charmes)

  1. (botany) Trees of genus Carpinus (hornbeam), of the Betulaceae family
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French charme, from Latin carmen (song, recitement, incantation).

Noun[edit]

charme m (invariable)

  1. A charm (quality)

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French charme, from Latin carmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

charme (plural charmes)

  1. A phrase believed to have magical efficacy; a charm.
  2. Enchantment; the result of a charm.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: charm
  • Scots: chairm
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

charme

  1. Alternative form of charmen

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French charme, from Old French charme, from Latin carmen (song, recitement, incantation).

Noun[edit]

charme m (plural charmes)

  1. (Jersey) spell

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

charme m (definite singular charmen, indefinite plural charmer, definite plural charmene)

  1. form removed by a 1991 spelling decision; superseded by sjarm

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

charme m (definite singular charmen, indefinite plural charmar, definite plural charmane)

  1. form removed by a 1991 spelling decision; superseded by sjarm

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

charme m (oblique plural charmes, nominative singular charmes, nominative plural charme)

  1. enchantment; magic spell

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: char‧me

Noun[edit]

charme m (plural charmes)

  1. charm (quality of inspiring delight or admiration)