caur

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the adverb cauri, from the same stem as the adjective caurs (having a hole) (q.v.).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

caur (with accusative)

  1. through (indicating movement through something else)
    jāt caur mežuto ride through the forest
    līst caur žoguto sneak through the fence
    saule iespīdēja caur loguthe sun shone through the window
    elpot caur degunu, caur mutito breathe through the nose, through the mouth
  2. through (simultaneously with, alternating with)
    smaidīt caur asāramto smile through the tears
    viņi runāja cits caur cituthey talked through each other (= at the same time)
  3. through, via (with someone's help or participation)
    saņemt ziņas caur tēvuto receive news through / via (one's) father

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “caurs”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *karuts, cognate with the Germanic tribal name Charudes.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

caur m (genitive curad or caurad, nominative plural curaid or cauraid)

  1. hero, warrior

Declension[edit]

Masculine t-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative caur curaidL, caurL curaid, cauraid
Vocative caur, caurad curaidL, caurL curtaH, caurtaH
Accusative curaidN, cauraidN, caurN curaidL, caurL curtaH, caurtaH
Genitive curad curadL curadN, cauradN
Dative curaidL, cauraidL curtaib, caurtaib curtaib, caurtaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Quotations[edit]

  • c. 1100, Táin Bó Cúailnge (Strachan 1944, p 6):
    Luid Conchobar íarum ⁊ cóeca cairptech imbi do neoch ba ṡruithem ⁊ ba airegdam inna caurad.
    Then he set off together and fifty chariot-warriors around him, from anyone who was the noblest and most illustrious of the heroes.
  • c. 1160, The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig, section 15:
    Fo chích curad / crechtaig, cathbuadaig, at comsa mac Findchoeme frim. [] Magen curad, / cride n-ega, eithre n-ela, / eirr trén tressa, trethan ágach, / cain tarb tnúthach.
    Under the breast of the hero / covered in wounds, victorious in battle, you are the son of Findchoem who is equal to me. [] Dwelling of a hero, / heart of ice, plumage of a swan / strong chariot-hero of battle, warlike sea, / beautiful fierce bull.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
caur chaur caur
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • caur” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “kawaro-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, page 196
  • Strachan, John, ed. (1944), Stories from the Táin. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy.

Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Scottish Gaelic ceàrr (wrong, incorrect, immoral, astray; left), from Old Irish cerr (crooked, wry, maimed).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [kɑːr], [kɔːr]
  • (Northern Scots) IPA(key): [kaːr], [keːr], [kɛr]

Adjective[edit]

caur (not comparable)

  1. left, left-handed
  2. awkward
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English carre, from Anglo-Norman carre, from Latin carra, neuter plural of carrus (four-wheeled baggage wagon).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [kɑːr], [kɔːr]
  • (Northern Scots, Insular Scots) IPA(key): [kaːr]

Noun[edit]

caur (plural caurs)

  1. car
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [kɑːr], [kɔːr]
  • (Northern Scots, Insular Scots) IPA(key): [kaːr]

Noun[edit]

caur

  1. plural of cauf