echo

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See also: Echo, écho, echó, ekhó, and echö

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English eccho, ecco, ekko, from Medieval Latin ecco, from Latin echo, from Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ), from ἠχή (ēkhḗ, sound). Possibly from the same Proto-Indo-European root as sough.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

echo (countable and uncountable, plural echoes or echos)

  1. A reflected sound that is heard again by its initial observer.
    • c. 1588–1593, William Shakespeare, “The Lamentable Tragedy of Titus Andronicus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene iii]:
      The babbling echo mocks the hounds.
    • 1709 May, Alexander Pope, “Pastorals. Summer. The Second Pastoral, or Alexis.”, in Poetical Miscellanies: The Sixth Part. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 1029666000, page 732:
      To you I mourn; nor to the Deaf I ſing, / The Woods ſhall anſwer, and their Echo ring.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter X, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      “Then what is your little trouble?” “My little trouble!” I felt that this sort of thing must be stopped at its source. It was only ten minutes to dressing-for-dinner time, and we could go on along these lines for hours. “Listen, old crumpet,” I said patiently. “Make up your mind whether you are my old friend Reginald Herring or an echo in the Swiss mountains. If you're simply going to repeat every word I say –”
    • 2013 May-June, William E. Conner, “An Acoustic Arms Race”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 206-7:
      Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.
  2. An utterance repeating what has just been said.
  3. (poetry) A device in verse in which a line ends with a word which recalls the sound of the last word of the preceding line.
  4. (figuratively) Sympathetic recognition; response; answer.
  5. (computing) The displaying on the command line of the command that has just been executed.
  6. (computing) An individual discussion forum using the echomail system.
    • 1992, Dial in (page 9)
      When someone asks an off-topic question [] they are usually quickly told to knock it off. You can't ask a question about modems in an echo devoted to local-area networks.
  7. (international standards) Alternative letter-case form of Echo from the NATO/ICAO Phonetic Alphabet.
  8. (whist, bridge) A signal, played in the same manner as a trump signal, made by a player who holds four or more trumps (or, as played by some, exactly three trumps) and whose partner has led trumps or signalled for trumps.
  9. (whist, bridge) A signal showing the number held of a plain suit when a high card in that suit is led by one's partner.
  10. An antisemitic punctuation symbol or marking, ((( ))), placed around a name or phrase to indicate the person is Jewish or the entity is controlled by Jewish people.
  11. (medicine, colloquial, uncountable) Clipping of echocardiography.
  12. (medicine, colloquial, countable) Clipping of echocardiogram.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

echo (third-person singular simple present echoes, present participle echoing, simple past and past participle echoed)

  1. (of a sound or sound waves, intransitive) To reflect off a surface and return.
  2. (transitive) To reflect back (a sound).
  3. (by extension, transitive) To repeat (another's speech, opinion, etc.).
    • 2013 July-August, Sarah Glaz, “Ode to Prime Numbers”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
      Some poems, echoing the purpose of early poetic treatises on scientific principles, attempt to elucidate the mathematical concepts that underlie prime numbers. Others play with primes’ cultural associations. Still others derive their structure from mathematical patterns involving primes.
    Sid echoed his father's point of view.
  4. (computing, transitive) To repeat its input as input to some other device or system.
    • 1991, Martin D. Seyer, RS-232 made easy:
      The device that is to echo the characters should be optioned for echoplexing.
  5. (intransitive, whist, bridge) To give the echo signal, informing one's partner about cards one holds.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

echo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of echar

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

echo n

  1. echo (reflected sound)

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • echo in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • echo in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.xoː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: echo

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch echo, from Latin ēchō, from Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ), from ἠχή (ēkhḗ, sound).

Noun[edit]

echo m (plural echo's, diminutive echootje n)

  1. echo
    Synonym: weergalm
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Papiamentu: èko, echo

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

echo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of echoën
  2. imperative of echoën

Ladino[edit]

Noun[edit]

echo m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling איג׳ו‎)

  1. work

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ēchō f sg (genitive ēchūs); fourth declension

  1. echo

Declension[edit]

Fourth-declension noun (all cases except the genitive singular in ), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative ēchō
Genitive ēchūs
Dative ēchō
Accusative ēchō
ēchōn
Ablative ēchō
Vocative ēchō
  • Only the nominative singular and the accusative singular ēchō and ēchōn are attested in ancient Latin.[1]

References[edit]

  • echo”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • echo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

echo n

  1. echo

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • echo in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • echo in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

echo m (plural echos)

  1. Obsolete spelling of eco (used in Portugal until September 1911 and in Brazil until the 1940s).

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

echo m (plural echos)

  1. (obsolete) throw

Verb[edit]

echo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of echar

Further reading[edit]