grimace

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: grimacé

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia
Commons
Wikimedia Commons has related media at:

Etymology[edit]

From French grimace [1], from Middle French grimace, from Old French grimace, grimuche, from grime (mask) (with the pejorative suffix -ace, from Latin -āceus), from Frankish *grīma, *grīmō (mask), from Proto-Germanic *grīmô (mask, helmet). Cognate with Old English grīma (mask, visor, helmet, spectre, apparition). More at grime.

Pronunciation[edit]

The pronunciation with stress on the second syllable was the usual one in the 1700s and 1800s, found in poetry[4] and preferred by dictionaries to the pronunciation with stress on the first syllable,[5] but it is now very rare.

Noun[edit]

grimace (plural grimaces)

  1. A contorted facial expression, often expressing contempt or pain.
    • 2005 March, Opera News:
      I trundle off to bed, eyes brimming, face twisted into a grateful glistening grimace, and awaken the next day wondering what all the fuss was about.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

grimace (third-person singular simple present grimaces, present participle grimacing, simple past and past participle grimaced)

  1. To make grimaces; to distort one's face; to make faces.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ grimace” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 grimace” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.
  3. 3.0 3.1 grimace” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  4. ^ For example, Scottish poet Robert Fergusson (1750–1774), in a poem, rhymes "na: rather gleefu' turn your face, / forsake hypocrisy, grimace". John Mitchell, in a work published in 1838, rhymes "without a hindrance or grimace, / a ready grave in every face".
  5. ^ For example, The Orthoëpist: A Pronouncing Manual (1880) by Alfred Ayres.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French grimace, from Old French grimace, grimuche (a contorted or wry face, grotesque countenance), from grime (mask) (with the pejorative suffix -ace, from Latin -āceus), from Old Frankish *grīma, *grīmo (mask), from Proto-Germanic *grīmô (mask, helmet, cover, night), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrey- (to strip, paint, smear). Cognate with Middle Dutch grime (mask), Old Saxon grīma (mask), Old English grīma (mask), Old Norse gríma (mask, helmet, night). More at grime.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grimace f (plural grimaces)

  1. grimace

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

grimace

  1. first-person singular present indicative of grimacer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of grimacer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of grimacer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of grimacer
  5. second-person singular imperative of grimacer

Further reading[edit]