esca

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See also: ESCA, ésca, and -esca

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ēsca (bait).

Noun[edit]

esca (plural escae)

  1. (ichthyology) fleshy growth from an anglerfish's head that acts as a lure

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ēsca.

Noun[edit]

esca f (plural esques)

  1. tinder (dry plants used to light a fire)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin ēsca.

Noun[edit]

esca f (plural esques)

  1. tinder (dry plants used to light a fire)
  2. bait (substance used in catching fish)

Synonyms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Circa 1300. From Old Galician and Old Portuguese, from Latin ēsca.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

esca f (plural escas)

  1. tinder (dry plants used to light a fire)
    • c1300, R. Martínez López, General Estoria. Versión gallega del siglo XIV. Oviedo: Publicacións de Archivum, page 220:
      y achou cõ aquel arco hum estormento, et seu esqueyro, et sua ysca, et seu pedernal em el
      there he found, together with that bow, a tinderbox, with its lighter, its tinder, and its flint inside it
  2. bait

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • ysca” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • ysca” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • esca” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.



Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ēsca.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

esca f (plural esche)

  1. bait, lure
  2. tinder

Verb[edit]

esca

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of uscire
  2. second-person singular present subjunctive of uscire
  3. third-person singular present subjunctive of uscire
  4. third-person singular imperative of uscire

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From edō (eat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ēsca f (genitive ēscae); first declension

  1. food; dish prepared for the table
  2. bait

Inflection[edit]

Note that there is the alternative form, ēscās, for the genitive singular, ēscae. First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ēsca ēscae
genitive ēscae ēscārum
dative ēscae ēscīs
accusative ēscam ēscās
ablative ēscā ēscīs
vocative ēsca ēscae

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • esca in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • esca in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • esca in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • esca in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin ēsca[1]. Compare the inherited doublet yesca.

Noun[edit]

esca f (plural escas)

  1. (dated) bait (substance used in catching fish)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]