victus

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Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From vīvō(live, survive).

Noun[edit]

vīctus m (genitive victūs); fourth declension

  1. living, way of life
  2. nourishment, provision, diet, that which sustains life
Inflection[edit]

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative vīctus vīctūs
genitive vīctūs vīctuum
dative vīctuī vīctibus
accusative vīctum vīctūs
ablative vīctū vīctibus
vocative vīctus vīctūs
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Participle[edit]

vīctus m (feminine vīcta, neuter vīctum); first/second declension

  1. lived, having been lived
  2. survived, having been survived
  3. resided in, having been resided in
Inflection[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative vīctus vīcta vīctum vīctī vīctae vīcta
genitive vīctī vīctae vīctī vīctōrum vīctārum vīctōrum
dative vīctō vīctō vīctīs
accusative vīctum vīctam vīctum vīctōs vīctās vīcta
ablative vīctō vīctā vīctō vīctīs
vocative vīcte vīcta vīctum vīctī vīctae vīcta

Etymology 2[edit]

Perfect passive participle of vincō(conquer).

Participle[edit]

victus m (feminine victa, neuter victum); first/second declension

  1. conquered, subdued, having been conquered.
Inflection[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative victus victa victum victī victae victa
genitive victī victae victī victōrum victārum victōrum
dative victō victō victīs
accusative victum victam victum victōs victās victa
ablative victō victā victō victīs
vocative victe victa victum victī victae victa
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • victus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • victus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • VICTUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.victus”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to have attained to a high degree of culture: omni vita atque victu excultum atque expolitum esse (Brut. 25. 95)
    • daily bread: victus cotidianus
    • meagre diet: victus tenuis (Fin. 2. 28. 90)
    • (ambiguous) the necessaries of life: quae ad victum pertinent
    • (ambiguous) things indispensable to a life of comfort: res ad victum cultumque necessariae
    • (ambiguous) a livelihood: quae suppeditant ad victum (Off. 1. 4. 12)
    • (ambiguous) to earn a livelihood by something: victum aliqua re quaerere
    • (ambiguous) to be defeated in fight, lose the battle: proelio vinci, superari, inferiorem, victum discedere
  • victus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers