damnum

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin damnum.

Noun[edit]

damnum ‎(uncountable)

  1. (law) harm; detriment

Related terms[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dh₂pnom ‎(expense, investment), from the root *deh₂p-, whence also daps ‎(sacrificial meal, feast).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

damnum n ‎(genitive damnī); second declension

  1. damage or injury
  2. (financial) loss
  3. a fine

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative damnum damna
genitive damnī damnōrum
dative damnō damnīs
accusative damnum damna
ablative damnō damnīs
vocative damnum damna

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • damnum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • damnum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • DAMNUM in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • damnum in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to suffer loss, harm, damage.[2: damnum (opp. lucrum) facere
    • to do harm to, injure any one: damnum inferre, afferre alicui
    • to know how to endure calamity: damnum ferre
    • to make good, repair a loss or injury: damnum or detrimentum sarcire (not reparare)
    • to balance a loss by anything: damnum compensare cum aliqua re
    • to make profit out of a thing: lucrum facere (opp. damnum facere) ex aliqua re
    • (ambiguous) to suffer loss, harm, damage: damno affici
  • damnum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • damnum in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 161