dano

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See also: Dano, daño, dañó, Daňo, da no, dáno, and Dano-

Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Old Norse danir (the Danes), from Proto-Germanic *daniz (Dane); compare Danish daner.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈdano]
  • Audio:
    (file)
  • Rhymes: -ano
  • Hyphenation: da‧no

Noun[edit]

dano (accusative singular danon, plural danoj, accusative plural danojn)

  1. a Dane

Derived terms[edit]

Middle Irish[edit]

Particle[edit]

dano

  1. Archaic form of dana (therefore).

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from dí- +‎ an- +‎ ṡiu[1].

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

dano (always postpositive)

  1. used to indicate that a clause contains an inference from what goes before: then, therefore
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 29a28
      Ní taibre grád for nech causa a pectha ꝉ a chaíngníma: ar bíit alaili and ro·finnatar a pecthe resíu do·coí grád forru; alaili is íarum ro·finnatar. Berir dano fri láa brátha.
      You sg should not confer orders on anyone because of his sin or of his good deed: for there are some whose sins are found out before their ordination, others whose [sins] are found out afterwards. Reference is made, then, to the day of judgment.
      (literally, “…before orders go upon them…”)
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 4b10
      Aidligni⟨gi⟩tir dano úadisi.
      Therefore they need it.
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 203a6
      arna derṅmis cum nobis; air dïa ndénmis cum me, do·génmis dano cum nobis
      that we might not make cum nobis; for if we made cum me, then we should make cum nobis
  2. used to indicate a parallel with what goes before: so also, so too
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 92a17
      Bed indbadigthi .i. bed chuintechti .i. cid fáilte ad·cot-sa ⁊ du·ngnéu, is túsu immid·folngi dam, a Dǽ; cid indeb dano ad·cot, is tú, Dǽ, immid·folngi dam.
      To be enriched, i.e. to be sought, i.e. though it is joy that I obtain and make, it is you who effects it for me, O God; so too, though it is wealth that I obtain, it is you, God, who effects it for me.
    • c. 850-875, Turin Glosses and Scholia on St Mark, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 484–94, Tur. 58a
      Bíid didiu a confessio hísin do foísitin pecthae, bíid dano do molad, bíid dano do atlugud buide; do foísitin didiu atá-som sunt.
      That confessio, then, is for confessing sins, so too is it for praising, so too is it for offering thanks; here, then, it is for confessing.
  3. however
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 14d3
      cid écen aisndís do neuch as doruid co léir, ní sechmalfaider cuimre and dano
      though it is necessary to explain carefully anything that is difficult, however brevity will not be passed by

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Irish: dana

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thurneysen, Rudolf (1940, reprinted 2003), D. A. Binchy and Osborn Bergin, transl., A Grammar of Old Irish, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, →ISBN, § 900, page 557

Further reading[edit]

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈda.nɔ/
  • Rhymes: -anɔ
  • Syllabification: da‧no

Verb[edit]

dano

  1. impersonal past of dać

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -ɐnu, (Brazil) -ɐ̃nu
  • Hyphenation: da‧no

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin damnum (damage), from Proto-Indo-European *dh₂pnom (expense, investment).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dano m (plural danos)

  1. damage (an instance or the state of being damaged)
    O casco do navio sofreu dano.
    The ship’s hull suffered some damage.
    Synonyms: avaria, estrago
  2. (law) injury (violation of a person, their character, feelings, rights, property, or interests)
  3. (video games, role-playing games) damage (a measure of how many hitpoints a weapon or unit can deal or take)
    Essa espada tem 20 de dano.
    This sword has 20 damage.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

dano

  1. first-person singular present indicative of danar

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Dani (Danes).

Adjective[edit]

dano (feminine dana, masculine plural danos, feminine plural danas, not comparable)

  1. Danish (of Denmark)
  2. (historical) of the Danes (Germanic tribe of the Danish islands and southern Sweden)
Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dano m (plural danos, feminine dana, feminine plural danas)

  1. Dane (person from Denmark)
    Synonyms: danês, dinamarquês
  2. (historical) Dane (member of the Danes)
Coordinate terms[edit]

See also[edit]