too

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See also: tóo, to'o, тоо, Tōō, töö, and tʼóó

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English to (also, in addition to), from Old English (furthermore, also, besides), adverbial use of preposition (to, into). The sense of "in addition, also" deriving from the original meaning of "apart, separately" (compare Old English prefix tō- (apart)). Doublet of to; see there for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

too (not comparable)

  1. (focus) Likewise.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XVI, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
      The preposterous altruism too! [] Resist not evil. It is an insane immolation of self—as bad intrinsically as fakirs stabbing themselves or anchorites warping their spines in caves scarcely large enough for a fair-sized dog.
    • 2013 July 26, Leo Hickman, “How algorithms rule the world”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 7, page 26:
      The use of algorithms in policing is one example of their increasing influence on our lives. And, as their ubiquity spreads, so too does the debate around whether we should allow ourselves to become so reliant on them – and who, if anyone, is policing their use.
  2. (conjunctive) Also; in addition.
    There has been a cutback in federal subsidies. Rates have been increasing too.
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter 1, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175:
      They burned the old gun that used to stand in the dark corner up in the garret, close to the stuffed fox that always grinned so fiercely. Perhaps the reason why he seemed in such a ghastly rage was that he did not come by his death fairly. Otherwise his pelt would not have been so perfect. And why else was he put away up there out of sight?—and so magnificent a brush as he had too.
    • 2013 July 19, Timothy Garton Ash, “Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 18:
      Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.
  3. (degree) To an excessive degree; over; more than enough.
    • 1620, Giovanni Bocaccio, John Florio, transl., The Decameron, Containing an Hundred Pleaſant Nouels: Wittily Diſcourſed, Betweene Seuen Honourable Ladies, and Three Noble Gentlemen[1], Isaac Iaggard, Nouell 8, The Eighth Day:
      [] purſued his vnneighbourly purpoſe in ſuch ſort: that hee being the ſtronger perſwader, and ſhe (belike) too credulous in beleeuing or elſe ouer-feeble in reſiſting, from priuate imparlance, they fell to action; and continued their cloſe fight a long while together, vnſeene and vvithout ſuſpition, no doubt to their equall ioy and contentment.
    • 2013 August 3, “Yesterday’s fuel”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      The dawn of the oil age was fairly recent. Although the stuff was used to waterproof boats in the Middle East 6,000 years ago, extracting it in earnest began only in 1859 after an oil strike in Pennsylvania. [] It was used to make kerosene, the main fuel for artificial lighting after overfishing led to a shortage of whale blubber. Other liquids produced in the refining process, too unstable or smoky for lamplight, were burned or dumped.
  4. (degree, colloquial) To a high degree, very.
    She doesn't talk too much.  I'm not too sure about this.
  5. (affirmation, colloquial) Used to contradict a negative assertion.
    "You're not old enough yet." ― "I am, too!"
  6. (archaic, colloquial) Used for emphasis, without reference to any previous statement.
    • 1852 March – 1853 September, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1853, OCLC 999756093:
      The trooper thanks his informant and rides slowly on, looking about him. [] He comes to a gateway in the brick wall, looks in, and sees a great perplexity of iron lying about in every stage and in a vast variety of shapes— [] "This is a place to make a man's head ache too!" says the trooper, looking about him for a counting-house.

Usage notes[edit]

  • When used in their senses as degree adverbs, very and too never modify verbs; very much and too much do instead.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Acholi[edit]

Noun[edit]

too

  1. fox

Afar[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtoː/
  • Hyphenation: too

Determiner[edit]

tóo

  1. that, those (feminine)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “too”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Asturian[edit]

Determiner[edit]

too n

  1. neuter singular of tou

Galice[edit]

Noun[edit]

too

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Harry Hoijer, Galice Athapaskan: A Grammatical Sketch, International Journal of American Linguistics, volume 32:4 (October 1966), pages 320-327

Hiligaynon[edit]

Adjective[edit]

toó

  1. dexter, right

Ingrian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *too, from Proto-Uralic *to. Cognates include Finnish tuo and Karelian tuo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

too

  1. that

Pronoun[edit]

too

  1. that
Declension[edit]
Declension of too
singular plural
nominative too noo
genitive toon noijen
accusative toon noo
partitive toota noota
illative tooho noohe
inessive toos noos
elative toost noost
allative toolle noolle
adessive tool nool
ablative toolt noolt
translative tooks nooks
essive toonna noonna
See also[edit]
Ingrian demonstratives
proximal neutral distal
singular tämä (tää) se too
plural nämät (näät) neet noo

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

too

  1. inflection of toovva:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. second-person singular imperative connegative

References[edit]

  • V. I. Junus (1936) Iƶoran Keelen Grammatikka[3], Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 99
  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 594
  • Olga I. Konkova; Nikita A. Dyachkov (2014) Inkeroin Keel: Пособие по Ижорскому Языку[4], →ISBN, pages 13-14

Karao[edit]

Noun[edit]

too

  1. person

Komba[edit]

Noun[edit]

too

  1. water

References[edit]


Koyukon[edit]

Noun[edit]

too

  1. water
    • (Can we date this quote?), Melissa Axelrod, The semantic of time. Aspectual Categorization in Koyukon Athabaskan, page 167 (Extrait de l’histoire traditionnelle : Tobaan Etseh)
      "Tsookʼaał, nelo too gheebenee?" yełnee.

Mwan[edit]

Noun[edit]

too

  1. day
  2. tomorrow

Sekani[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • choo (in some other dialects)

Noun[edit]

too

  1. (Kwadacha dialect) water

References[edit]

  • Sharon Hargus, Documenting for revitalization: Kwadacha Tsek'ene, a case study (2014)

West Makian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

too

  1. (transitive) to wrap up

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of too (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person totoo motoo atoo
2nd person notoo fotoo
3rd person inanimate itoo dotoo
animate
imperative notoo, too fotoo, too

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[5], Pacific linguistics

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English to, from Old English .

Adverb[edit]

too

  1. too
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 11:
      W' vengem too hard, he zunk ee commane,
      With venom too hard, he sunk his bat-club,

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 88

Yoruba[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hausa tṑ, compare with Baatonum to

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

tóò

  1. okay, well