eke

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Eke, éke, and ê-ke

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English eken (to increase), from Old English īecan, ēcan or Old English ēacan (to increase), from Proto-Germanic *aukaną (increase), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwg-e-ti, from *h₂ewg- (to increase). Cognate with Norwegian Bokmål øke, Danish øge, Icelandic auka, Swedish öka, Latin augeō, Old English ēac (also).

Verb[edit]

eke (third-person singular simple present ekes, present participle eking, simple past and past participle eked)

  1. (obsolete except in "eke out") To increase; to add to, augment, lengthen.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun[edit]

eke (plural ekes)

  1. (obsolete) An addition.
    • (Can we date this quote by Geddes and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      In the former case, they are a real part of the text, and should be printed in the same character: in the latter, they are generally ill-assorted and clumsy ekes, that may well be spared; and which often disfigure the narration []
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English eke, eake (an addition), from Old English ēaca (an addition, increase, advantage, usury, interest), from Proto-Germanic *aukô (an addition, increase). Akin to Old Frisian āka (addition, increase, bonus), Old Norse auki (increase, growth, proliferation).

Noun[edit]

eke (plural ekes)

  1. (beekeeping, archaic) A very small addition to the bottom of a beehive, often merely of a few bands of straw, on which the hive is raised temporarily.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English eek (also), from Old English ēac, ēc (also), from Proto-Germanic *auk (also). Akin to Saterland Frisian uk, ook (also), West Frisian ek (also), Dutch ook (also), German auch (also), Swedish ock (also).

Adverb[edit]

eke (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Also.
    • 1557, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, The Soote Season
      The soote season, that bud and bloom forth brings / With green hath clad the hill and eke the vale; []
    • 1663, Hudibras, by Samuel Butler, part 1, canto 1
      'Tis false: for Arthur wore in hall / Round-table like a farthingal, / On which, with shirt pull'd out behind, / And eke before, his good knights dined.
    • 1782, The Diverting History of John Gilpin, by William Cowper
      'John Gilpin was a citizen / of credit and renown / A train-band captain eke was he / of famous London town.'
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from a Chuvash-type Turkic language before the times of the Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin (at the turn of the 9th and 10th centuries). Compare the Turkish verb form ek.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛkɛ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: eke

Noun[edit]

eke (plural ekék)

  1. plough (UK), plow (US)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative eke ekék
accusative ekét ekéket
dative ekének ekéknek
instrumental ekével ekékkel
causal-final ekéért ekékért
translative ekévé ekékké
terminative ekéig ekékig
essive-formal ekeként ekékként
essive-modal
inessive ekében ekékben
superessive ekén ekéken
adessive ekénél ekéknél
illative ekébe ekékbe
sublative ekére ekékre
allative ekéhez ekékhez
elative ekéből ekékből
delative ekéről ekékről
ablative ekétől ekéktől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
ekéé ekéké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
ekééi ekékéi
Possessive forms of eke
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. ekém ekéim
2nd person sing. ekéd ekéid
3rd person sing. ekéje ekéi
1st person plural ekénk ekéink
2nd person plural ekétek ekéitek
3rd person plural ekéjük ekéik

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

eke

  1. to embark

Pali[edit]

Numeral[edit]

eke

  1. inflection of eka (one):
    1. masculine nominative/accusative/vocative plural
    2. feminine vocative singular

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish, from ek (oak).

Noun[edit]

eke n

  1. (uncountable) wood of oak

Declension[edit]

Declension of eke 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative eke eket
Genitive ekes ekets

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

eke

  1. dative singular of ek

Volapük[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

eke

  1. dative singular of ek

Zazaki[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

eke

  1. if