ok

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Contents

English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ok

  1. (informal) Alternative letter-case form of OK

Anagrams[edit]


Bimin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok

  1. water

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok

  1. genitive plural of oko

Elfdalian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse haukr, from Proto-Germanic *habukaz, Cognate with Swedish hök.

Noun[edit]

ok m

  1. hawk
Declension[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto cardinal numbers
 <  7 8 9  > 
    Cardinal : ok
    Ordinal : oka
    Adverbial : oke
    Multiplier : okobla
    Fractional : okona

Etymology[edit]

From Latin octo

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ok

  1. (cardinal) eight (8)

Derived terms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ok, from Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok n (genitive singular oks, plural ok)

  1. yoke

Declension[edit]

Declension of ok
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative ok okið ok okini
accusative ok okið ok okini
dative oki okinum okum okunum
genitive oks oksins oka okanna

German Low German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *auk, like German auch.

Adverb[edit]

ok

  1. also; and also

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the obsolete dialectal okik (to learn a lesson, to be edified), itself from a Turkic language.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok (plural okok)

  1. cause
  2. reason

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative ok okok
accusative okot okokat
dative oknak okoknak
instrumental okkal okokkal
causal-final okért okokért
translative okká okokká
terminative okig okokig
essive-formal okként okokként
essive-modal
inessive okban okokban
superessive okon okokon
adessive oknál okoknál
illative okba okokba
sublative okra okokra
allative okhoz okokhoz
elative okból okokból
delative okról okokról
ablative októl okoktól
Possessive forms of ok
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. okom okaim
2nd person sing. okod okaid
3rd person sing. oka okai
1st person plural okunk okaink
2nd person plural okotok okaitok
3rd person plural okuk okaik

Derived terms[edit]

(Compound words):

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ok, from Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok n (genitive singular oks, nominative plural ok)

  1. yoke

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Ido cardinal numbers
 <  7 8 9  > 
    Cardinal : ok
    Ordinal : okesma
    Adverbial : okfoye
    Multiplier : okopla
    Fractional : okima
Ido Wikipedia article on ok

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto ok, from Latin octo, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *oḱtṓw.

Numeral[edit]

ok

  1. (cardinal) eight (8)

Iwam[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok

  1. water

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Ninggerum[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok

  1. water

Further reading[edit]


North Muyu[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok

  1. water

Further reading[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *auk (also). Cognate with Old English ēac, Old Frisian āk, Old Saxon ōk, Old High German ouh, Gothic 𐌰𐌿𐌺 (auk).

Conjunction[edit]

ok (runic script ᚢᚴ)

  1. and
Descendants[edit]
  • Danish: og
  • Faroese: og
  • Icelandic: og
  • Norwegian: og (Bokmål), og (Nynorsk)
  • Swedish: och

Adverb[edit]

ok

  1. also, too
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Noun[edit]

ok n (genitive oks, plural ok)

  1. yoke
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Danish: åg
  • Faroese: ok
  • Icelandic: ok
  • Norwegian: åk
  • Swedish: ok

References[edit]

  • ok in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *auk.

Adverb[edit]

ōk

  1. also, too

Portuguese[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ok

  1. Alternative letter-case form of OK

Noun[edit]

ok m (plural oks)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of OK

South Muyu[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok

  1. water

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse ok, from Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Noun[edit]

ok n

  1. yoke; a wooden bar used to connect two oxen by their shoulders
  2. yoke; a wooden bar to be placed over one's shoulders, and used to carry buckets
  3. heavy burden
  4. yoke; the part of a shirt draped over the wearer's shoulders
Declension[edit]
Declension of ok 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ok oket ok oken
Genitive oks okets oks okens
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ok

  1. Alternative form of och

Adverb[edit]

ok

  1. Alternative form of ock

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic 𐰸 (ok, arrow), from Proto-Turkic.

Noun[edit]

ok (definite accusative oku, plural oklar)

  1. arrow

Derived terms[edit]


Vilamovian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ok

  1. only, to

Volapük[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ok

  1. oneself

Declension[edit]


Wambon[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok

  1. water

Further reading[edit]


Yessan-Mayo[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok m

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Australian Languages: Classification and the comparative method (2004, ISBN 9027295115
  • transnewguinea.org, citing D. C. Laycock, Languages of the Lumi Subdistrict (West Sepik District), New Guinea (1968), Oceanic Linguistics, 7 (1): 36-66 (as okw)