ake

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ake ‎(third-person singular simple present akes, present participle aking, simple past and past participle aked)

  1. Archaic spelling of ache.
    • ... for let our finger ake, / And it endues our other heathfull membersOthello (Quarto 1), Shakespeare, 1622
    • 1909, Henry C. Shelley, Inns and Taverns of Old London[1], text edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2004:
      instead he went with the rogues to supper in an arbour, though it made his heart "ake" to listen to their mad talk.
    • 2015, LT Wolf, The World King (fiction), ISBN 978-1-312-37454-6:
      The ake of months of a growing firenlust became a rising queem til at last there was the burst of loosing that almost made his knees buckle.

Etymology 2[edit]

Maori.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ake ‎(not comparable)

  1. forever

Anagrams[edit]


Bantik[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

References[edit]


Galela[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Donald A. Burquest, ‎Wyn D. Laidig, Descriptive studies in languages of Maluku, volume 2 (1995), page 6:
    Tabaru Galela
    [ˈakere] 'water' [ˈake] 'water'
  • Robinson Ipol, Yosafat Etha, Deidre Shelden, Galela conversations (1989): ake

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

akē

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌺𐌴

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qate, from Proto-Oceanic *qate, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. (anatomy) liver (organ of the body)

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ake

  1. to yearn for, desire

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ake

  1. rōmaji reading of あけ

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ac.

Conjunction[edit]

ake

  1. Alternative form of ac
    • approx. 1225, Hali Meidenhad (Holy Maidenhood)
      Not of low on earth, ake of the high in heaven.
    • approx. 1225, Homilies in Lambeth
      Those men.. have the name of Christians, ake though they are Christ's unwins (enemies).
    • approx. 1300, The Fox and the Wolf
      He was still, ne spake no-more, ake he worth athirst well sore.
    • circa 1350, Midland Prose Psalter
      Blessed be the man that.. ne set nowt in false judgement. Ake his will was in the will of our Lord.
    • circa 1390, Walter Hilton, On the Mixed Life
      This thought is good.. ake if a man may not lightly have salvation ne devotion in it, I hold it not speedful.
    • approx. 1450, South English Legendary: Temporale
      It ... rotted fast; ake that flesh and that blood rotteth never-more.

References[edit]


Ratahan[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

Reference[edit]

  • J. N. Sneddon, The Languages of Minahasa, North Celebes (1970)
  • J. N. Sneddon, Proto-Sangiric & the Sangiric Languages (1984), page 61

Swahili[edit]

Adjective[edit]

-ake ‎(declinable)

  1. his/her/its (third-person singular possessive adjective)
  2. their (third-person plural inanimate possessive adjective)

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


Ternate[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Yuiti Wada, Correspondance of Consonants in North Halmahera Languages (1980)

Tidore[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Possessive clauses in East Nusantara, the case of Tidore, in The Expression of Possession (2009, ISBN 3110213230)
  • Donald A. Burquest, Wyn D. Laidig, Descriptive studies in languages of Maluku, volume 2 (1995), page 52