ake

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See also: Ake, Åke, and àkẹ̀

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ake (third-person singular simple present akes, present participle aking, simple past aked or oke, past participle aked or aken)

  1. Archaic spelling of ache.
    • ... for let our finger ake, / And it endues our other heathfull membersOthello (Quarto 1), Shakespeare, 1622
    • 1909, Henry C. Shelley, Inns and Taverns of Old London[1], text edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2004:
      instead he went with the rogues to supper in an arbour, though it made his heart "ake" to listen to their mad talk.
    • 2015, LT Wolf, The World King (fiction), ISBN 978-1-312-37454-6:
      The ake of months of a growing firenlust became a rising queem til at last there was the burst of loosing that almost made his knees buckle.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Maori.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ake (not comparable)

  1. (New Zealand) forever
    • 1882, B. Francis, Isles of the Pacific: Or, Sketches from the South Seas, page 78:
      The answer given was : — " Friends, this is the reply of the Maori : we shall fight on ake, ake, ake, for ever, for ever, for ever."
    • 1907, Wilhelm Dittmer, Te Tohunga: The Ancient Legends and Traditions of the Maoris:
      That was the time when the great wish grew in the heart of Maui, the wish to conquer his powerful enemy Hine-nui-te-po, that Night might die and man may live for ever: ake, ake, ake!—yes, it was his great wish.
    • 1938, Edith J. Lyttleton & ‎G. B. Lancaster, Promenade, page 383:
      "Ake, ake, ake," said Von Tempsky, weary over the camp-fire. "Has there been anything like it since the days of the old Greeks? What madness makes you kill such men when you may want them to fight for you some day?"
    • 1997, Queenie Rikihana, Paki Waitara: Myths & Legends of the Māori, ISBN 0790005530, page 33:
      One day Maui visited his parents to tell them of his latest plan — he wished to conquer his powerful enemy Hine-nui-te-po so that the Night might die and man would live forever: ake, ake, ake!

Anagrams[edit]


Bantik[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

References[edit]


Galela[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Donald A. Burquest, ‎Wyn D. Laidig, Descriptive studies in languages of Maluku, volume 2 (1995), page 6:
    Tabaru Galela
    [ˈakere] 'water' [ˈake] 'water'
  • Robinson Ipol, Yosafat Etha, Deidre Shelden, Galela conversations (1989): ake

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

akē

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌺𐌴

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *qate, from Proto-Oceanic *qate, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. (anatomy) liver (organ of the body)

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ake

  1. to yearn for, desire

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ake

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あけ

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ac.

Conjunction[edit]

ake

  1. Alternative form of ac
    • approx. 1225, Hali Meidenhad (Holy Maidenhood)
      Not of low on earth, ake of the high in heaven.
    • approx. 1225, Homilies in Lambeth
      Those men.. have the name of Christians, ake though they are Christ's unwins (enemies).
    • approx. 1300, The Fox and the Wolf
      He was still, ne spake no-more, ake he worth athirst well sore.
    • circa 1350, Midland Prose Psalter
      Blessed be the man that.. ne set nowt in false judgement. Ake his will was in the will of our Lord.
    • circa 1390, Walter Hilton, On the Mixed Life
      This thought is good.. ake if a man may not lightly have salvation ne devotion in it, I hold it not speedful.
    • approx. 1450, South English Legendary: Temporale
      It ... rotted fast; ake that flesh and that blood rotteth never-more.

References[edit]


Ratahan[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

Reference[edit]

  • J. N. Sneddon, The Languages of Minahasa, North Celebes (1970)
  • J. N. Sneddon, Proto-Sangiric & the Sangiric Languages (1984), page 61

Swahili[edit]

Adjective[edit]

-ake (declinable)

  1. his/her/its (third-person singular possessive adjective)
  2. their (third-person plural inanimate possessive adjective)

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


Ternate[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Yuiti Wada, Correspondance of Consonants in North Halmahera Languages (1980)

Tidore[edit]

Noun[edit]

ake

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Possessive clauses in East Nusantara, the case of Tidore, in The Expression of Possession (2009, ISBN 3110213230
  • Donald A. Burquest, Wyn D. Laidig, Descriptive studies in languages of Maluku, volume 2 (1995), page 52