ac

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Noun[edit]

ac ‎(plural acs)

  1. account; money of account
  2. acre
  3. air conditioning
  4. alicyclic
  5. (electricity) alternating current

Adjective[edit]

ac ‎(not comparable)

  1. (medicine) ante cibum, before meals

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin acus. Compare Romanian ac.

Noun[edit]

ac n (plural atsi/atse)

  1. needle

Classical Nahuatl[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

āc ‎(plural āc ihqueh or āquihqueh)

  1. who?

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Karttunen, Frances (1983) An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl, Austin: University of Texas Press, page 1
  • Lockhart, James (2001) Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts, Stanford: Stanford University Press, page 210

Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

ac

  1. plural of at

Latin[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. Alternative form of atque
    Eminentissimum ac reverendissimum dominum.
    The Most Eminent and Reverend Lord.
    Ea res longe aliter, ac ratus erat, evenit.
    It happened far differently than he had thought.

Usage notes[edit]

  • ac is usually found before words beginning with consonants, rarely before vowels.

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ac.

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. but
    • approx. 1250, A Lovesong of Our Lord
      I lie, no not I, ac Christ lieth in me.
    • circa 1325, Harrowing of Hell
      Let us never be forlorn, ac bring us out of Hell's pain.
    • approx. 1340, Ayenbite of Inwyt
      Ac the ilk that sweareth hedously.. the ilk sinneth deadly.
    • circa 1380, Sir Firumbras
      Be not aghast, ac hold forth your way and hast(haste)ǃ

References[edit]


Middle Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. and

Preposition[edit]

ac

  1. with

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

PIE root
*h₂eyǵ-

From Proto-Germanic *aiks, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyǵ- ‎(oak).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

āc f

  1. oak (wood or tree)
  2. (poetic) an oaken ship
  3. The runic character (/a/)
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ak. Cognate with Old Saxon ac, Gothic 𐌰𐌺 ‎(ak), Old High German oh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. but

Old Saxon[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. Alternative form of ak

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin acus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- ‎(sharp).

Noun[edit]

ac n ‎(plural ace)

  1. needle

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. prevocalic form of a ‎(and)