ac

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronunciation depends on if this is an initialism, in which case it is pronounced as the letters A and C.

If it is an abbreviation, it is pronounced as the full word it abbreviates.

The pronuncation of the medical abbreviation depends on the preference of the user or reader, and whether it is translated from Latin or not.

Noun[edit]

ac ‎(plural acs)

  1. account; money of account
  2. acre
  3. air conditioning
  4. alicyclic
  5. (electricity) alternating current

Adjective[edit]

ac ‎(not comparable)

  1. (medicine) ante cibum, before meals



Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin acus. Compare Romanian ac.

Noun[edit]

ac n (plural atsi/atse)

  1. needle

Classical Nahuatl[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

āc ‎(plural āc ihqueh or āquihqueh)

  1. who?

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Karttunen, Frances (1983) An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl, Austin: University of Texas Press, page 1
  • Lockhart, James (2001) Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts, Stanford: Stanford University Press, page 210

Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

ac

  1. plural of at

Latin[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. Alternative form of atque
    Eminentissimum ac reverendissimum dominum.
    The Most Eminent and Reverend Lord.
    Ea res longe aliter, ac ratus erat, evenit.
    It happened far differently than he had thought.

Usage notes[edit]

  • ac is usually found before words beginning with consonants, rarely before vowels.

References[edit]

  • ac in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ac in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • more than once; repeatedly: semel atque iterum; iterum ac saepius; identidem; etiam atque etiam
    • the position of the lower classes: condicio ac fortuna hominum infimi generis
    • the result has surprised me; I was not prepared for this development: res aliter cecidit ac putaveram
    • to exert oneself very energetically in a matter: multum operae ac laboris consumere in aliqua re
    • written records; documents: litterae ac monumenta or simply monumenta
    • a lifelike picture of everyday life: morum ac vitae imitatio
    • to be an inexperienced speaker: rudem, tironem ac rudem (opp. exercitatum) esse in dicendo
    • to arrange and divide the subject-matter: res componere ac digerere
    • to hold by the letter (of the law): verba ac litteras or scriptum (legis) sequi (opp. sententia the spirit)
    • somebody's darling: mel ac deliciae alicuius (Fam. 8. 8. 1)
    • to think one thing, say another; to conceal one's opinions: aliter sentire ac loqui (aliud sentire, aliud loqui)
    • without any disguise, frankly: sine fuco ac fallaciis (Att. 1. 1. 1)
    • with moderation and judgment: modice ac sapienter
    • a sound and sensible system of conduct: vitae ratio bene ac sapienter instituta
    • to promise an oath to..: iureiurando ac fide se obstringere, ut
    • to dwell in a certain place: domicilium (sedem ac domicilium) habere in aliquo loco
    • to take up one's abode in a place, settle down somewhere: sedem ac domicilium (fortunas suas) constituere alicubi
    • to live a luxurious and effeminate life: delicate ac molliter vivere
    • to invite some one to one's house: invitare aliquem tecto ac domo or domum suam (Liv. 3. 14. 5)
    • to shun publicity: publico carere, forum ac lucem fugere
    • to cause universal disorder: omnia turbare ac miscere
    • a man who has held many offices: honoribus ac reipublicae muneribus perfunctus (De Or. 1. 45)
    • to trample all law under foot: ius ac fas omne delere
    • the victory cost much blood and many wounds, was very dearly bought: victoria multo sanguine ac vulneribus stetit (Liv. 23. 30)
    • to keep the coast and harbours in a state of blockade: litora ac portus custodia clausos tenere
    • so much for this subject...; enough has been said on..: ac (sed) de ... satis dixi, dictum est

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ac.

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. but
    • approx. 1250, A Lovesong of Our Lord
      I lie, no not I, ac Christ lieth in me.
    • circa 1325, Harrowing of Hell
      Let us never be forlorn, ac bring us out of Hell's pain.
    • approx. 1340, Ayenbite of Inwyt
      Ac the ilk that sweareth hedously.. the ilk sinneth deadly.
    • circa 1380, Sir Firumbras
      Be not aghast, ac hold forth your way and hast(haste)ǃ

References[edit]


Middle Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. and

Preposition[edit]

ac

  1. with

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aiks, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyǵ-(oak).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

āc f

  1. oak (wood or tree)
  2. (poetic) an oaken ship
  3. The runic character (/a/)
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ak. Cognate with Old Saxon ac, Gothic 𐌰𐌺(ak), Old High German oh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. but

Old Saxon[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. Alternative form of ak

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin acus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ-(sharp).

Noun[edit]

ac n ‎(plural ace)

  1. needle

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. prevocalic form of a(and)