ach

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: ách, -ach, and ACH

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English ache, from Old French ache, from Latin apium (parsley).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ach (plural achs)

  1. (obsolete) Any of several species of plants, such as smallage, wild celery, parsley.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ach

  1. An expression of annoyance.
    • 1958, Anthony Burgess, The Enemy in the Blanket (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972:
      "Ach." Auntie frowned hugely. "That is all nonsense."

Etymology 3[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ach

  1. Alternative form of och

Anagrams[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ach

  1. First-person plural inclusive general possessive; our (inclusive)

Related terms[edit]



Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronoun[edit]

ach

  1. (Sette Comuni) accusative of iart: you (plural; polite singular)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • “ach” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɑx/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ach
  • Rhymes: -ɑx

Interjection[edit]

ach

  1. oh, expresses compassion, surprise and dismay

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: ag

Esperanto[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ach

  1. H-system spelling of

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German ach, from Old High German ah.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ach

  1. oh (expressing surprise, wonder, amazement, or awe)
  2. oh (expressing sorrow)
  3. oh (expressing understanding, recognition, or realization)
  4. oh (preceding an offhand or annoyed remark)
  5. oh (preceding an invocation or address, but rarely a solemn one)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ach in Duden online
  • ach in Kluge's Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, 1891

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish acht (but, except), from Proto-Celtic *ektos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eǵʰs.

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ach

  1. but

Preposition[edit]

ach (plus nominative, triggers no mutation)

  1. except, but
Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ach

  1. but, only, merely

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Alternative forms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ach!

  1. ah! och! ugh!

Further reading[edit]


Middle Low German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ach

  1. oh (an expression of grievance or displeasure)

North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian acht. Compare West Frisian acht.

Numeral[edit]

ach

  1. (Heligoland) eight

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish acht (but, except), from Proto-Celtic *ektos, from Proto-Indo-European *eghs.

Conjunction[edit]

ach

  1. but
    Thèid mise ach cha tèid thusa.I'll go but you won't [go].
  2. except, only
    Cha robh ann ach trì daoine.There were only three people (literally "there was not there but/except for three people").

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened form of feuch.

Conjunction[edit]

ach

  1. so that
    Dh'aontaich e ach am biodh adhartas air choireigin ann.He agreed so that there would be some progress.

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *akkā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ekkeh₂ (compare Latin Acca (Larentia), a Roman goddess, Ancient Greek Ἀκκώ (Akkṓ, nurse of Demeter), Sanskrit अक्का (akkā, mother)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ach f (plural achau or achoedd)

  1. kinship
  2. pedigree, ancestry
  3. (plural) lineage
  4. (plural) genealogy, family roots

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
ach unchanged unchanged hach
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “ach”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies