cha

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Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

cha

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Chamorro.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Chinese (chá), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *s-la, via two routes: in some cases from Hindustani चा () / چا () (a variant of the same root, from Persian چا, which led to chai), from Northern Chinese; in other cases from (chá) /t͡sʰɑː²¹/, the pronunciation found in Canton (Guangzhou), where the British bought much of their tea in the 19th century. Doublet of tea, which is from the Amoy Min Nan pronunciation .

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /t͡ʃɑː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː

Noun[edit]

cha (uncountable)

  1. tea, sometimes (dialect) specifically masala chai
    Would you like a cup of cha?
    • 1934 August 4, George Herriman, Krazy Kat, Saturday, comic strip, →ISBN, page 206:
      [Krazy Kat, bringing a full tray:] Look, folkses – hot dogs, hot cha, hot peppa pots, hot timollies – hot kuffy. [sic]
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation spelling of you, especially when preceded by a t sound.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

cha

  1. (dialectal, nonstandard) You.
    • 1976, Flying Magazine, page 34:
      You mean you can't fly after you've had a few beers? You can drive, can't cha?
    • 2005, Busta Rhymes, CeeLo Green (lyrics and music), “Don't Cha”, performed by Pussycat Dolls:
      Don't cha wish your girlfriend was a freak like me?
    • 2008, Barbara L. Jent, The Weddin' Day, Barbara Jent, →ISBN, page 157:
      “You'll be ridin' with us, won't cha, Josh?”
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From cha-cha (q.v.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. (dance) Used to count out steps, particularly involving the hip-shaking sections of rhythmic Latin dances
    One–two–chachacha
    Three–four–chachacha
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From the McCune-Reischauer romanization of Korean (ja).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha (plural chas or cha)

  1. (Korean units of measure) Synonym of Korean foot: a traditional unit of length equivalent to about 30.3 cm.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Alemannic German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German kweman, chuman, from Proto-Germanic *kwemaną. Cognate with German kommen, Dutch komen, English come, Icelandic koma, Gothic 𐌵𐌹𐌼𐌰𐌽 (qiman).

Verb[edit]

cha

  1. (Uri) to come

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Atong (India)[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hindi चार (cār).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cha (Bengali script চা)

  1. four

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from con.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha (Triggers lenition of b, c, f, g, m, p, s. Triggers eclipsis of d, t.)

  1. (Ulster) not
    Cha phósann sí é.
    She will not marry him.
    Cha dtugaim.
    I do not give, I will not give.

Usage notes[edit]

Used only in some varieties of Ulster Irish. Not used with the future tense; a future meaning can be conveyed by using it with the present tense.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (used in Munster Irish, Connacht Irish, and some varieties of Ulster Irish)

Related terms[edit]

  • chan (used before vowel sounds)
  • char (used before the past tense)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 68

Further reading[edit]

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

cha

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ちゃ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of チャ

Kapampangan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Chinese (chá), highly likely via Cantonese caa4 rather than Hokkien .

Noun[edit]

cha

  1. tea

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha m inan

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter ch.

See also[edit]

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

cha

  1. Nonstandard spelling of chā.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of chá.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of chǎ.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of chà.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Manx[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from con. Compare Irish , cha, Scottish Gaelic cha.

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. not
    Cha bee'n poosey ayn.The marriage will not take place.
    Cha vel blass er.It has no taste.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Used with the dependent form of a verb. With the copula, the verb may be suppressed.
  • Becomes chan before a vowel.

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverb[edit]

cha

  1. Alternative form of cho

References[edit]

Navajo[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha

  1. crying, weeping

Pacoh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Katuic *caa, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *caʔ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cha 

  1. to eat

Affixed forms[edit]

Pali[edit]

Pali cardinal numbers
 <  5 6 7  > 
    Cardinal : cha
    Ordinal : chaṭṭha

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Apparently from Sanskrit *ष्वष् (ṣvaṣ), variant of षष् (ṣaṣ);[1] see there for further etymology.

Numeral[edit]

cha

  1. six[2]

Declension[edit]

Optionally indeclinable.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alexander Lubotsky (2000), “Indo-Aryan 'six'”, in 125 Jahre Indogermanistik in Graz. Arbeiten aus der Abteilung “Vergleichende Sprachwissenschaft"[1], Graz: Leykam, pages 255-261
  2. ^ Pali Text Society (1921–1925), “cha”, in Pali-English Dictionary‎, London: Chipstead

Pipil[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃa/

Verb[edit]

-cha

  1. Clipping of -chiwa.

Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Conjunction[edit]

cha

  1. (Puter, Vallader) that

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

cha

  1. (Puter, Vallader) who, whom

Alternative forms[edit]

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish nochan, from Old Irish nícon, from (not) + con (toward). Cognates include Irish cha and Manx cha.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /xa/
  • Hyphenation: cha

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. Used together with a dependent form of a verb to form the negative: not
    Cha robh bean aig Iain.Ian didn't have a wife.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Before a word starting with a vowel or fh, the form chan is used.
  • Lenites the following word unless it starts with t or d, although in some dialects those words may be lenited as well.

Verb[edit]

cha

  1. Negative forms of the copula: is not
    Cha mhise m’ athair.I am not my father.
    Cha bhòrd bòrd gun aran ach ’s bòrd aran leis fhèin.A table without bread is no table but bread is a table by itself.
    Cha toigh leam càise.I don't like cheese.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Before a word starting with a vowel or fh, the form chan is used.
  • Lenites the following word unless it starts with t or d, although in some dialects those words may be lenited as well.
  • Does not lenite pronouns except for mi, mise.

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Portuguese chá, from Cantonese (caa4). Compare Tagalog tsa, Cebuano tsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃa/ [ˈt͡ʃa]
  • Rhymes: -a
  • Syllabification: cha

Noun[edit]

cha m (plural chas)

  1. (Philippines, historical) tea
    Synonym:

Further reading[edit]

  • cha”, in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014
  • Venancio M. de Abella (1874) Vade-Mecum Filipino ó manual de la conversacion familiar Español-Tagalog[2] (in es, tl), 12.ᵃ edition, Escolta, Manila: Ramirez y Giraudier, page 115

Swahili[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

-cha (infinitive kucha)

  1. to dawn, (of the sun) to rise
    Antonym: -chwa
  2. to fear, be afraid
Usage notes[edit]

In Standard Swahili, the sense "to fear" is used of reverential fear, generally fearing God. However, in the Mombasa dialect, it is used as a synonym of -ogopa.

Conjugation[edit]
Conjugation of -cha
Positive present -nakucha
Subjunctive -che
Negative -chi
Imperative singular kucha
Infinitives
Positive kucha
Negative kutokucha
Imperatives
Singular kucha
Plural kucheni
Tensed forms
Habitual hucha
Positive past positive subject concord + -likucha
Negative past negative subject concord + -kucha
Positive present (positive subject concord + -nakucha)
Singular Plural
1st person ninakucha/nakucha tunakucha
2nd person unakucha mnakucha
3rd person m-wa(I/II) anakucha wanakucha
other classes positive subject concord + -nakucha
Negative present (negative subject concord + -chi)
Singular Plural
1st person sichi hatuchi
2nd person huchi hamchi
3rd person m-wa(I/II) hachi hawachi
other classes negative subject concord + -chi
Positive future positive subject concord + -takucha
Negative future negative subject concord + -takucha
Positive subjunctive (positive subject concord + -che)
Singular Plural
1st person niche tuche
2nd person uche mche
3rd person m-wa(I/II) ache wache
other classes positive subject concord + -che
Negative subjunctive positive subject concord + -siche
Positive present conditional positive subject concord + -ngekucha
Negative present conditional positive subject concord + -singekucha
Positive past conditional positive subject concord + -ngalikucha
Negative past conditional positive subject concord + -singalikucha
Gnomic (positive subject concord + -acha)
Singular Plural
1st person nacha twacha
2nd person wacha mwacha
3rd person m-wa(I/II) acha wacha
m-mi(III/IV) wacha yacha
ji-ma(V/VI) lacha yacha
ki-vi(VII/VIII) chacha vyacha
n(IX/X) yacha zacha
u(XI) wacha see n(X) or ma(VI) class
ku(XV/XVII) kwacha
pa(XVI) pacha
mu(XVIII) mwacha
Perfect positive subject concord + -mekucha
"Already" positive subject concord + -meshakucha
"Not yet" negative subject concord + -jacha
"If/When" positive subject concord + -kicha
"If not" positive subject concord + -sipokucha
Consecutive kacha / positive subject concord + -kacha
Consecutive subjunctive positive subject concord + -kache
Object concord (indicative positive)
Singular Plural
1st person -nicha -tucha
2nd person -kucha -wacha/-kucheni/-wacheni
3rd person m-wa(I/II) -mcha -wacha
m-mi(III/IV) -ucha -icha
ji-ma(V/VI) -licha -yacha
ki-vi(VII/VIII) -kicha -vicha
n(IX/X) -icha -zicha
u(XI) -ucha see n(X) or ma(VI) class
ku(XV/XVII) -kucha
pa(XVI) -pacha
mu(XVIII) -mucha
Reflexive -jicha
Relative forms
General positive (positive subject concord + (object concord) + -cha- + relative marker)
Singular Plural
m-wa(I/II) -chaye -chao
m-mi(III/IV) -chao -chayo
ji-ma(V/VI) -chalo -chayo
ki-vi(VII/VIII) -chacho -chavyo
n(IX/X) -chayo -chazo
u(XI) -chao see n(X) or ma(VI) class
ku(XV/XVII) -chako
pa(XVI) -chapo
mu(XVIII) -chamo
Other forms (subject concord + tense marker + relative marker + (object concord) + -kucha)
Singular Plural
m-wa(I/II) -yekucha -okucha
m-mi(III/IV) -okucha -yokucha
ji-ma(V/VI) -lokucha -yokucha
ki-vi(VII/VIII) -chokucha -vyokucha
n(IX/X) -yokucha -zokucha
u(XI) -okucha see n(X) or ma(VI) class
ku(XV/XVII) -kokucha
pa(XVI) -pokucha
mu(XVIII) -mokucha
Some forms not commonly seen in modern Standard Swahili are absent from the table. See Appendix:Swahili verbs for more information.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Other scripts
Ajami گَـ

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. Ki class inflected form of -a.

Swazi[edit]

Interjection[edit]

cha

  1. no

Tagalog[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃa/, [ˈt͡ʃa]

Noun[edit]

cha (Baybayin spelling ᜆ᜔ᜐ)

  1. Alternative form of tsa

Etymology 2[edit]

From fast pronunciation spelling of tihaya.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃaʔ/, [ˈt͡ʃaʔ]

Adjective[edit]

châ (Baybayin spelling ᜆ᜔ᜐ) (card games, dated, slang)

  1. face-up (in playing cards)
    Synonym: tihaya
    Antonyms: chub, taob
Alternative forms[edit]
See also[edit]

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Limchowese (zaa1, “father”).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha (, , 𤕔)

  1. (dated or literary or Catholicism) a father
  2. (Southern Vietnam, humorous) a dude
    Synonyms: bố, cha nội
    Thôi dẹp đi cha!
    Stop it, dude!

Pronoun[edit]

cha

  1. (dated or literary) I/me, your father
  2. (dated or literary) you, my father
  3. (Catholicism) you, father

Derived terms[edit]

Derived terms

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Welsh[edit]

Verb[edit]

cha

  1. Aspirate mutation of ca.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ca ga ngha cha
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Western Apache[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha

  1. beaver

Woleaian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Micronesian *caa, from Proto-Oceanic *draʀaq, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *daʀaq, from Proto-Austronesian *daʀaq.

Noun[edit]

cha

  1. blood

Verb[edit]

cha

  1. (stative) red
  2. (stative) bloody, bleeding

Ye'kwana[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. Allomorph of ka (interrogative particle) used after words that end in i.

Zacatepec Chatino[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cha

  1. sharp

Zulu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

cha

  1. no
    Synonym: qha

References[edit]