cha

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See also: CHA, chá, chà, chā, chả, chǎ, -cha, and -chá

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Sinitic , from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *s-la, via two routes: in some cases from Hindi चा ‎() / Urdu چا ‎() (a variant of the same root, from Persian چا, which lead to chai), from Northern Chinese; in other cases from /t͡sʰɑː²¹/, the pronunciation found in Canton (Guangzhou), where the British bought much of their tea in the 19th century.

Noun[edit]

cha ‎(uncountable)

  1. tea
    Would you like a cup of cha?
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Eye dialect spelling of you.

Pronoun[edit]

cha

  1. (dialectal, nonstandard) You.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. Component of the set phrase cha-cha, also spelled cha cha cha and other variants.

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from con.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha (Triggers lenition of b, c, f, g, m, p, s. Triggers eclipsis of d, t.)

  1. (Ulster) not
    Cha phósann sí é.‎ ― She will not marry him.
    Cha dtugaim.‎ ― I do not give, I will not give.

Usage notes[edit]

Used only in some varieties of Ulster Irish. Not used with the future tense; a future meaning can be conveyed by using it with the present tense.

Related terms[edit]

  • chan (used before vowel sounds)
  • char (used before the past tense)

Synonyms[edit]

  • (used in Munster Irish, Connacht Irish, and some varieties of Ulster Irish)

References[edit]

  • "cha" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • nícon” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

cha

  1. rōmaji reading of ちゃ
  2. rōmaji reading of チャ

Kapampangan[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha

  1. tea

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

cha

  1. Nonstandard spelling of chā.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of chá.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of chǎ.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of chà.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Manx[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from con.

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. not
    Cha bee'n poosey ayn.‎ ― The marriage will not take place.
    Cha vel blass er.‎ ― It has no taste.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used with the dependent form of a verb. With the copula, the verb may be suppressed.
  • Becomes chan before a vowel.

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverb[edit]

cha

  1. Alternative form of cho

References[edit]

  • nícon” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Navajo[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha

  1. crying, weeping

Pali[edit]

Pali cardinal numbers
 <  5 6 7  > 
    Cardinal : cha
    Ordinal : chaṭṭha

Alternative forms[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cha

  1. (cardinal) six

Pipil[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃa/

Verb[edit]

-cha

  1. Short for -chiwa.

Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Conjunction[edit]

cha

  1. (Puter, Vallader) that

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) che
  • (Sutsilvan) ca, c'
  • (Surmiran) tgi

Pronoun[edit]

cha

  1. (Puter, Vallader) who, whom

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) che
  • (Sutsilvan) tge
  • (Surmiran) tgi

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from con.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. not
    Cha robh bean aig Iain.‎ ― Iain didn't have a wife.
    Cha toigh leam càise.‎ ― I don't like cheese.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used with the dependent form of a verb. With the copula, the verb may be suppressed.
  • Becomes chan before a vowel.

References[edit]

  • nícon” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Swahili[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. Ki class inflected form of -a.

Usage notes[edit]

  1. The particle follows class 7 nouns to form a genitival relation of a noun that follows it, often corresponding to of or 's:
    kitabu cha mtoto‎ ― child's book
    kiini cha yai‎ ― egg yolk (lit. center of egg)

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha ‎(, , 𤕔)

  1. (dated, literary) father; dad
  2. (Catholic) father, Catholic priest

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Verb[edit]

cha

  1. Aspirate mutation of ca.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ca ga ngha cha
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.