Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/aiks

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This Proto-Germanic entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Germanic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

May be from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éyǵs (oak), if related to the first component *αἴξ (*aíx) of Ancient Greek αἰγίλωψ (aigílōps), from a root *h₂eyǵ- whence also Lithuanian áižuols, Latvian uôzuōls, Albanian enjë (< Proto-Albanian *aignjā) and possibly Latin aesculus (if earlier *aig-sculus). However all of the supposed Indo-European cognates are of unclear origin, and according to Kroonen this fact along with the root-noun inflection may be indicative of a non-Indo-European substrate origin; compare also Basque ezkur (acorn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

*aiks f[1]

  1. oak tree
  2. oak (wood)

Inflection[edit]

consonant stemDeclension of *aiks (consonant stem)
singular plural
nominative *aiks *aikiz
vocative *aik *aikiz
accusative *aikų *aikunz
genitive *aikiz *aikǫ̂
dative *aiki *aikumaz
instrumental *aikē *aikumiz

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • West Germanic: *aik
    • Old English: āc, ǣċ, aac
      • Middle English: ak, ake, ook
    • Old Frisian: ēk
      • North Frisian: ik
      • Saterland Frisian: Eeke
      • West Frisian: iik
    • Old Saxon: ēk
    • Old Dutch: *eik, *ēk
    • Old High German: eih
      • Middle High German: eich
        • Bavarian: [Term?]
          Cimbrian: aicha
        • Central Franconian: Ääch, Eech, Eich
          Hunsrik: Eich
          Luxembourgish: Eech
        • East Central German:
          Upper Saxon: [Term?]
          Vilamovian: aach
        • East Franconian: [Term?]
        • German: Eiche
        • Rhine Franconian: Ääch, Eech
          Frankfurterisch: Aasch [aːʃ]
  • Old Norse: eik
    • Icelandic: eik
    • Faroese: eik
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: eik
    • Norwegian Bokmål: eik
    • Old Swedish: ēk
      • Swedish: ek
    • Danish: eg
    • Gutnish: aik
    • Westrobothnian: eik

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013) , “*aik-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 9