burden

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See also: Bürden

English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English burden, birden, burthen, birthen, byrthen, from Old English byrden, byrþen, from Proto-West Germanic *burþini, from *burþī, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to carry, bear).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

burden (plural burdens)

  1. A heavy load.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      There were four or five men in the vault already, and I could hear more coming down the passage, and guessed from their heavy footsteps that they were carrying burdens.
  2. A responsibility, onus.
  3. A cause of worry; that which is grievous, wearisome, or oppressive.
  4. The capacity of a vessel, or the weight of cargo that she will carry.
    a ship of a hundred tons burden
  5. (mining) The tops or heads of stream-work which lie over the stream of tin.
  6. (metalworking) The proportion of ore and flux to fuel, in the charge of a blast furnace.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
  7. A fixed quantity of certain commodities.
    A burden of gad steel is 120 pounds.
  8. (obsolete, rare) A birth.
    [] that bore thee at a burden two fair sons.
  9. (medicine) The total amount of toxins, parasites, cancer cells, plaque or similar present in an organism.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

burden (third-person singular simple present burdens, present participle burdening, simple past and past participle burdened)

  1. (transitive) To encumber with a literal or figurative burden.
    to burden a nation with taxes
  2. (transitive) To impose, as a load or burden; to lay or place as a burden (something heavy or objectionable).
    • (Can we date this quote by Coleridge and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      It is absurd to burden this act on Cromwell.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French bordon. See bourdon.

Noun[edit]

burden (plural burdens)

  1. (music) A phrase or theme that recurs at the end of each verse in a folk song or ballad.
  2. The drone of a bagpipe.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ruddiman to this entry?)
  3. Theme, core idea.
    the burden of the argument

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From bord +‎ -en (adjectival ending)

Adjective[edit]

burden

  1. Alternative form of borden

Etymology 2[edit]

From burde +‎ -en (plural ending)

Noun[edit]

burden

  1. plural of burde

West Frisian[edit]

Noun[edit]

burden

  1. plural of burd