bourdon

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French bourdon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bourdon ‎(plural bourdons)

  1. (music, archaic) The burden or bass of a melody.
    • 1985, Anthony Burgess, Kingdom of the Wicked:
      The earth tremors resumed and made a bourdon to the loud psalms that they sang, interspersed with the odd ode of Horace recited by Silas.
  2. The drone pipe of a bagpipe.
  3. The lowest-pitched stop of an organ.
    • 1890, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Vintage 2007, p. 5:
      The dim roar of London was like the bourdon note of a distant organ.
  4. The lowest-pitched bell of a carillon.
  5. A large, low-pitched bell not part of a diatonically tuned ring of bells.
  6. A bumblebee, genus Bombus.
  7. A pilgrim's staff.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French bourdon ‎(honeybee, bumblebee), from Old French bordon ‎(bumblebee, drone, beetle, insect), from Medieval Latin burdo ‎(c. CE 1000), first recorded in the Homilies of King Ælfric, glossed by Old English dora ‎(bumblebee). Of uncertain origin. Possibly from Frankish *bordo, *burdo ‎(beetle, insect), from Proto-Germanic *buzdô ‎(beetle, grub", literally, "swelling), from *būs- ‎(to errupt, burst, flow rapidly), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūs- ‎(to move quickly), related to Old English budda ‎(beetle), Middle Low German buddech ‎(thick, swollen), Low German budde ‎(louse, grub). See bug.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bourdon m ‎(plural bourdons)

  1. bumblebee (species of bee)
  2. (music) drone
  3. blues (feeling of sadness)

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French bordon ‎(bumblebee, drone, beetle, insect), from Medieval Latin burdo.

Noun[edit]

bourdon m (plural bourdons)

  1. (Jersey) bumblebee

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]