burdo

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See also: Burdo

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French bourdon

Noun[edit]

burdo (accusative singular burdon, plural burdoj, accusative plural burdojn)

  1. bumble-bee

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Not natively Latin since an initial v would be expected; probably of Celtic origin, from Gaulish *burdus (mule), according to Whatmough, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷr̥dus, *gʷrd-o- (slow, heavy, tired).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

burdō m or f (genitive burdōnis); third declension

  1. mule; hinny (offspring of a jackass and a mare or of a stallion and a jenny)

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative burdō burdōnēs
Genitive burdōnis burdōnum
Dative burdōnī burdōnibus
Accusative burdōnem burdōnēs
Ablative burdōne burdōnibus
Vocative burdō burdōnēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Adams, J. N., “The Generic Use of “Mula” and the Status and Employment of Female Mules in the Roman World”, in Rheinisches Museum für Philologie, volume 136, 1993, DOI:10.2307/41233885, pages 55–60
  • Ernout, Alfred; Meillet, Antoine, “burdo”, in Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue latine: histoire des mots (in French), with additions and corrections of André J., 4th edition, Paris: Klincksieck, 2001, page 78
  • burdo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • burdo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • burdo in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • Roberts, Edward A., A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, 2014, →ISBN
  • The Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies, Volume 29, Issue 2 (1981)
  • Latin Notes, Volumes 1-6 (1923)

Sardinian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin burdus (bastard, mule), probably of Celtic origin.

Noun[edit]

burdo

  1. bastard
  2. not original
  3. not working properly

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin burdus (bastard, mule), probably of Celtic origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbuɾdo/, [ˈbuɾ.ð̞o]

Adjective[edit]

burdo (feminine burda, masculine plural burdos, feminine plural burdas)

  1. coarse, rough
  2. crude
    Synonyms: crudo, rudo
  3. rude, uncouth
    Synonym: bruto

References[edit]