rude

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin rudis (rough, raw, rude, wild, untilled).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rude (comparative ruder, superlative rudest)

  1. bad-mannered
    Which do you find the most rude? Staring, pointing, farting loudly, whistling, or asking how someone died?
  2. Somewhat obscene, pornographic, offensive.
  3. tough, robust.
  4. undeveloped, unskilled, basic.
    • 2 Corinthians 11:6 (KVJ)
      But though I be rude in speech, yet not in knowledge
    • (Can we date this quote?), Rudyard Kipling, The Conundrum of the Workshops
      When the flush of a new-born sun fell first on Eden's green and gold,
      Our father Adam sat under the Tree and scratched with a stick in the mould;
      And the first rude sketch that the world had seen was joy to his mighty heart,
      Till the Devil whispered behind the leaves, "It's pretty, but is it Art?"
    • 1767, Adam Ferguson, An Essay on the History of Civil Society
      It might be apprehended, that among rude nations, where the means of subsistence are procured with so much difficulty, the mind could never raise itself above the consideration of this subject
  5. hearty, vigorous; found particularly in the phrase rude health.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rudis.

Adjective[edit]

rude m, f (masculine and feminine plural rudes)

  1. rude

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ruːdə/, [ˈʁuːðə]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German rūte, from Old High German rūta (German Raute (rhomb)), probably from Latin rūta (rue).

Noun[edit]

rude c (singular definite ruden, plural indefinite ruder)

  1. pane
  2. window
  3. square
  4. lozenge, diamond
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From late Old Norse rúta, from Middle Low German rūde, from Latin rūta (rue).

Noun[edit]

rude c (singular definite ruden, plural indefinite ruder)

  1. (botany) rue (various perennial shrubs of the genus Ruta)
Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin rudis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rude m (feminine rude, masculine plural rudes, feminine plural rudes)

  1. rough, harsh
  2. tough, hard; severe
  3. crude, unpolished
  4. hardy, tough, rugged
  5. (informal) formidable, fearsome

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rudis, rudem.

Adjective[edit]

rude (invariable)

  1. tough
  2. rough, coarse

Anagrams[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rudis.

Adjective[edit]

rude (epicene, plural rudes)

  1. rough

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rude

  1. nominative neuter singular of rudis
  2. accusative neuter singular of rudis
  3. vocative neuter singular of rudis

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rude f

  1. plural form of ruda