rudis

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Friulian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rudis

  1. plural of rude

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *Hrew- (to tear up, dig up). Related to rudus.

Adjective[edit]

rudis (neuter rude); third-declension two-termination adjective

  1. rough, raw, uncultivated
  2. unrefined, unskilled, awkward
Declension[edit]

Third-declension two-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative rudis rude rudēs rudia
Genitive rudis rudium
Dative rudī rudibus
Accusative rudem rude rudēs
rudīs
rudia
Ablative rudī rudibus
Vocative rudis rude rudēs rudia
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Catalan: rude
  • Old French: rude
  • Italian: rude
  • Norman: rude
  • Piedmontese: rudi
  • Portuguese: rude, rudo
  • Spanish: rudo
  • Swedish: rudis
  • Vulgar Latin: *rudius

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

rudis f (genitive rudis); third declension

  1. small stick
  2. foil (given to a gladiator upon his discharge)
Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (i-stem, ablative singular in -e or ).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative rudis rudēs
Genitive rudis rudium
Dative rudī rudibus
Accusative rudem rudēs
rudīs
Ablative rude
rudī
rudibus
Vocative rudis rudēs
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • rudis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • rudis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • rudis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • rudis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be well-informed, erudite: multarum rerum cognitione imbutum esse (opp. litterarum or eruditionis expertem esse or [rerum] rudem esse)
    • to be an inexperienced speaker: rudem, tironem ac rudem (opp. exercitatum) esse in dicendo
    • to have had no experience in war: rei militaris rudem esse
    • (ambiguous) to retire from service: rude donatum esse (Phil. 2. 29)
  • rudis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • rudis in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin