fardo

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See also: fardó

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Two etymologies have been proposed. The most common view purports it to come from Arabic فَرْض (farḍ, crease, parting), and with this very sense is first registered in Spain's 'Diccionario de la lengua española' (1884), as do Freytag and Bocthor in their respective works. The root verb for the noun would thus be فَرَضَ (faraḍa, to crease, to notch). Spanish alfarda (tax for having creased the ground to make a water canal) would support this interpretation.

The alternative is a derivation from Latin fartus (stuffed, filled), from farcio (I fill), via Vulgar Latin first and then French (vd. French fardeau and French farce for more), having thence extended to Catalan farcell, Italian fardello, Spanish and Portuguese. This interpretation is supported by the fact that the sense of 'load, baggage' (ca. 1150) is attested earlier than the sense of 'crease, notch' (ca. 1400).

Noun[edit]

fardo m (plural fardi)

  1. A kind of sack used to transport coffee

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Two etymologies have been proposed. The most common view purports that it comes from Arabic فَرْض (farḍ, crease, parting), and this very sense is first registered in the Diccionario de la lengua española (DLE, (1884), as do Freytag and Bocthor in their respective works. The root verb for the noun would thus be فَرَضَ (faraḍa, to crease, to notch). Spanish alfarda (tax for having creased the ground to make a water canal) would support this interpretation.

The alternative is a derivation from Latin fartus (stuffed, filled), from farcio (I fill), via Vulgar Latin first and then French (see French fardeau and French farce for more), having thence extended to Catalan farcell, Italian fardello, Spanish and Portuguese. This interpretation is supported by the fact that the sense of 'load, baggage' (ca. 1150) is attested earlier than the sense of 'crease, notch' (ca. 1400).

Noun[edit]

fardo m (plural fardos)

  1. bale, truss, bundle
    um fardo de palhaa bale of straw
  2. package, parcel
  3. (by extension) burden

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:fardo.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Two etymologies have been proposed. The most common view purports that it comes from Arabic فَرْض (farḍ, crease, parting), and this very sense is first registered in the Diccionario de la lengua española (DLE, (1884), as do Freytag and Bocthor in their respective works. The root verb for the noun would thus be فَرَضَ (faraḍa, to crease, to notch). Spanish alfarda (tax for having creased the ground to make a water canal) would support this interpretation.

The alternative is a derivation from Latin fartus (stuffed, filled), from farcio (I fill), via Vulgar Latin first and then French (see French fardeau and French farce for more), having thence extended to Catalan farcell, Italian fardello, Spanish and Portuguese. This interpretation is supported by the fact that the sense of 'load, baggage' (ca. 1150) is attested earlier than the sense of 'crease, notch' (ca. 1400).

Noun[edit]

fardo m (plural fardos)

  1. bundle
  2. stack
  3. burden

Verb[edit]

fardo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of fardar.

References[edit]

  • Centre National des Ressources Textuelles et Lexicales: fardeau, farde
  • Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico, Volumen II: Ce-f. 1996 (1ª ed., 6ª imp.), Joan Coromines and José Pascual, p. 858, ISBN 978-84-249-1363-2