ic

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See also: IC, , -ic, -ić, -ič, iċ-, and -iĉ-

Translingual[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Number[edit]

ic

  1. (informal) A Roman numeral representing ninety-nine (99).

See also[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

ic

  1. in this case.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ic

  1. I

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: ik

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Germanic cognates include Old Frisian ik, Old Saxon ik, Old Dutch ik (Dutch ik), Old High German ih (German ich), Old Norse ek (Swedish jag), Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik). The Indo-European root, in various forms, is also the source of Sanskrit अहम् (ahám), Latin egō (French je, Spanish yo, Italian io etc.), Ancient Greek ἐγώ (egō), Lithuanian , Latvian es, Avestan azəm[script?], Old Church Slavonic азъ (azŭ) (Russian я (ja)), Old Armenian ես (es). For declined derivations, see under , etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. I, used by the speaker referring to himself or herself as the subject, or in agreement with that subject

Declension[edit]

Singular Dual Plural
nominative , ih wit
accusative meċ, uncit, unc ūsiċ, ūs
genitive mīn uncer ūser, ūre
dative unc ūs

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun[edit]

ic

  1. Alternative spelling of ik.

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Low German: ik

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hungarian ék.

Noun[edit]

ic n (plural icuri)

  1. wedge