ic

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Translingual[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Symbol[edit]

ic

  1. (informal) A Roman numeral representing ninety-nine (99).

See also[edit]


K'iche'[edit]

Noun[edit]

ic

  1. (Classical K'iche') chile

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek. The accusative and dative are Old Dutch , from Proto-Germanic *miz, originally only the dative form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ic

  1. I

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: ik
    • Afrikaans: ek

Further reading[edit]

  • “ic”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek[1], 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J., “ic”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek[2], The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1885–1929, →ISBN

Middle English[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ic

  1. Alternative form of I (I)

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Germanic cognates include Old Frisian ik, Old Saxon ik, Old Dutch ik (Dutch ik), Old High German ih (German ich), Old Norse ek (Swedish jag), Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik). The Indo-European root, in various forms, is also the source of Sanskrit अहम् (ahám), Latin egō (French je, Spanish yo, Italian io etc.), Ancient Greek ἐγώ (egṓ), Lithuanian , Latvian es, Avestan 𐬀𐬰𐬆𐬨(azəm), Old Church Slavonic азъ (azŭ) (Russian я (ja), Bulgarian аз (az)), Old Armenian ես (es). For declined derivations, see under , etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. I
    lufiġe þē.
    I love you.
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, John 6:20
      hit eom. Ne ondrǣdaþ ēow.
      It's me [literally I am it]. Don't be afraid.
    • The Life of Saint Margaret
      nylle nān word mā of þīnum mūðe ġehīeran.
      I don't want to hear one more word out of your mouth.

Usage notes[edit]

In modern English, object pronouns are often used as subjects in a wide variety of circumstances ("Me and her are friends", "you're as big as me"). In Old English only subject pronouns were used as subjects (except with a small class of verbs such as līcian, mǣtan, and twēoġan, which took dative or accusative subjects with nouns and pronouns alike). Thus "me and her are friends" was and hēo sind frīend, literally "I and she are friends." Other examples: Þū eart swā miċel swā ! ("You're as big as me!", lit. "as I"), Ġē dōþ simle swelċe ġē beteran sīen þonne ("You guys always act like you're better than me", lit. "I"), Is þæt lā? ("Is that him?", lit. "he"), hit eom ("It's me", lit. "I it am").

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Southern Middle English: ich
    • English: ich (obsolete since 19th century)
  • Northern Middle English: ik
    • Scots: ik (rare)
  • Later Middle English: I
    • English: I
    • Scots: A, I

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun[edit]

ic

  1. Alternative spelling of ik

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Low German: ik

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Hungarian ék.

Noun[edit]

ic n (plural icuri)

  1. wedge